Protecting tiny trees

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I've always heard autumn is when you plant trees, true? Do I need to water them?

I have 7 willows & 3 mulberrys to plant. They are wee little things and not on a tall, bare trunk. Think bushy, wild, messy. Lol

I'll have a few more next year to plant.

Anyway, anyone have ideas for very cheap 4L×4W×3H foot protective cages for them? I'll build them proper fencing next year when I know which have survived winter. They need safety from my greedy sheep.

I rather not use wood pallets, they leave rusty nails all over the place. Hot wire doesn't work on my sheep. I've tried welded wire, but my sheep smash it until it breaks.

Triangles may work, if tall n wide enough.

I'll try to get more plastic pallets, but if I can't get more, what else is there??
 
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Ridgerunner

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I've always heard autumn is when you plant trees, true? Do I need to water them?

Yes. In VA your ground will not freeze this winter, at least not long and not deep. You do not want the roots to dry out the first couple of years after you plant them. Water regularly.

Anyway, anyone have ideas for very cheap 4L×4W×3H foot protective cages for them?

Not really. I did this for deer and it worked but I think your sheep would overcome it. A thought. If you are planting more next year, build something permanent now and replant any that die next year. Cages already made.

DSCF0547.JPG
 

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I've always heard autumn is when you plant trees, true? Do I need to water them?

I have 7 willows & 3 mulberrys to plant. They are wee little things and not on a tall, bare trunk. Think bushy, wild, messy. Lol

I'll have a few more next year to plant.

Anyway, anyone have ideas for very cheap 4L×4W×3H foot protective cages for them? I'll build them proper fencing next year when I know which have survived winter. They need safety from my greedy sheep.

I rather not use wood pallets, they leave rusty nails all over the place. Hot wire doesn't work on my sheep. I've tried welded wire, but my sheep smash it until it breaks.

Triangles may work, if tall n wide enough.

I'll try to get more plastic pallets, but if I can't get more, what else is there??
cattle panel with t-bars if you have problems with bigger animals leaning in and trying to mash things.

they've not mashed your fence for the pond down that i recall so how was that built?
 

thistlebloom

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cattle panel with t-bars if you have problems with bigger animals leaning in and trying to mash things.

they've not mashed your fence for the pond down that i recall so how was that built?
Yes to cattle panels. If you have a grinder or a Sawzall you can cut them into appropriate sized pieces and zip tie together in a triangle or square. Any other wire won't last the onslaught and is just wasted money.

And most definitely yes to water. As Ridge said for at least the first two years. The more you take care of their water needs the first two years the more likely they are to survive with an excellent root system. Trees and shrubs first two years are critical for that.
 

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willows and mulberry trees planted not too near the house too as they are rather messy trees from what my brother experienced, willows drop a lot of small branches and twigs and then the mulberries drop those fruits too.
 

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cattle panel with t-bars if you have problems with bigger animals leaning in and trying to mash things.

they've not mashed your fence for the pond down that i recall so how was that built?
There's nothing delicious in there. The iris isn't safe for them to eat & they hate mint & I think taro is also not safe.
 

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willows and mulberry trees planted not too near the house too as they are rather messy trees from what my brother experienced, willows drop a lot of small branches and twigs and then the mulberries drop those fruits too.
American Sycamore has been far worse & more dangerous! Some years ago, I was out back brushing my pony on his right side. There's a Sycamore on his left, down 250ft or so. It suddenly dropped a green, leafy branch as thick as my thigh! I remember because this was the first time my pony managed to spook in place & not plow me over! 😍 I was so proud of him!

Anyway, we have lots of them everywhere & I hate them so much....

I used to have a huge mulberry tree right by the house, maybe 25ft away. It was great, but electric company cut it down...


These will be out in pasture to provide natural shade for the sheep.
 

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Yes to cattle panels. If you have a grinder or a Sawzall you can cut them into appropriate sized pieces and zip tie together in a triangle or square. Any other wire won't last the onslaught and is just wasted money.

And most definitely yes to water. As Ridge said for at least the first two years. The more you take care of their water needs the first two years the more likely they are to survive with an excellent root system. Trees and shrubs first two years are critical for that.
Ugh...
Any recommendations on which tree watering bladder is best?
No way in heck I can water them any other way...
 

flowerbug

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even just making sure they don't dry out when it is hot outside, during the tough times and when it hasn't been raining enough, will help them get through. early planting now and keeping them watered if it doesn't rain will give them a head start on the coming tougher season.
 

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even just making sure they don't dry out when it is hot outside, during the tough times and when it hasn't been raining enough, will help them get through. early planting now and keeping them watered if it doesn't rain will give them a head start on the coming tougher season.
I forget to water the plants on my deck, that I pass by a half dozen times a day...😅 So...😰
 

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