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Cricket

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My in-laws have black rasberry bushes but the berries unfortunately didn't get picked and have dried up or gone bad. Could I still get seeds from these berries to try and make starts out of?
 

heirloomgal

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My in-laws have black rasberry bushes but the berries unfortunately didn't get picked and have dried up or gone bad. Could I still get seeds from these berries to try and make starts out of?
Raspberry bushes tend to be propagated by their runners, not so much the seeds. If they are 1st year plants, next year when spring arrives they will surrounded by new plants emerging from underground runners from the original bush. Dig those small plants up and you can replant those where you like to get more bushes. Raspberries reproduce vegetatively VERY quickly, and I would even add aggressively!
 

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Raspberry bushes tend to be propagated by their runners, not so much the seeds. If they are 1st year plants, next year when spring arrives they will surrounded by new plants emerging from underground runners from the original bush. Dig those small plants up and you can replant those where you like to get more bushes. Raspberries reproduce vegetatively VERY quickly, and I would even add aggressively!
Thank you!! These are very established bushes, should I wait till next year to try to get a start or could I go ahead and get them planted this year?
 

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Thank you!! These are very established bushes, should I wait till next year to try to get a start or could I go ahead and get them planted this year?

i think you can do it about anytime the plants are actively growing, but during this hot time of the year you will have to remember to keep them watered enough if there aren't enough rains.

also, to make sure you get a good crop plant plenty of 1yr old pieces and then you won't have to wait another season (what grows this year is what will have fruit next year).

the following is a good link showing a way to trellis and prune. :) it's a bit more elaborate than anything i've done, but it has clear pictures and explains everything well.

 
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Ridgerunner

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I had to look it up, you are from the Indiana/Ohio border. I just can't remember these things. You still have enough growing season left. I'd get started now. When I ordered black raspberries from a nursery they did not send plants. They sent a few pieces of roots about 10" long and maybe the thickness of a pencil, maybe a bit less. I buried those about 2" deep. That was winter so they were dormant. In the spring they sent up canes from the roots. That was in northern Arkansas, a little south of you.

I think you have plenty of time before winter hits for them to get established enough to handle your winters. I'd mulch to insulate and protect them just as a precaution. As Flowerbug said, don't let them dry out. The point of this is that I don't think you have to transplant actual plants, the roots should be enough to get a start, even this time of the year.

With those established canes I'd look for small plants that you are confident just started this year. Dig out an 8" to 12" segment of roots with it and transplant it. To me the smaller that plant is the better, less for that unestablished root to support. If that cane died back due to transplant shock I'd still expect that root to send up more shoots this summer/fall. If you find other segments of roots with no sprouts you can plant those too, they should send up canes. I don't think you will get enough growth this year to get much of a harvest next year but at least they should be established. To me that would be the main goal.

The ideal time to transplant them is probably when they are dormant, just bury some roots. I try to not let the pursuit of perfection stop me from doing what I need to do, some people can always find an excuse to wait. For me the best time to do something is often when I can. If they fail to send up any canes this summer/fall you can always get some more roots this winter and plant them, but I really don't think that will be necessary. If they like growing in your area they will be like a weed. I had to aggressively mow to keep them contained to the row I planted them in.
 

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i think you can do it about anytime the plants are actively growing, but during this hot time of the year you will have to remember to keep them watered enough if there aren't enough rains.

also, to make sure you get a good crop plant plenty of 1yr old pieces and then you won't have to wait another season (what grows this year is what will have fruit next year).

the following is a good link showing a way to trellis and prune. :) it's a bit more elaborate than anything i've done, but it has clear pictures and explains everything well.

Thank you so much for the link I will check that out!! They just moved and they are definitely out of control lol so I don't think they will mind me thinning them out a bit 😊
 

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I had to look it up, you are from the Indiana/Ohio border. I just can't remember these things. You still have enough growing season left. I'd get started now. When I ordered black raspberries from a nursery they did not send plants. They sent a few pieces of roots about 10" long and maybe the thickness of a pencil, maybe a bit less. I buried those about 2" deep. That was winter so they were dormant. In the spring they sent up canes from the roots. That was in northern Arkansas, a little south of you.

I think you have plenty of time before winter hits for them to get established enough to handle your winters. I'd mulch to insulate and protect them just as a precaution. As Flowerbug said, don't let them dry out. The point of this is that I don't think you have to transplant actual plants, the roots should be enough to get a start, even this time of the year.

With those established canes I'd look for small plants that you are confident just started this year. Dig out an 8" to 12" segment of roots with it and transplant it. To me the smaller that plant is the better, less for that unestablished root to support. If that cane died back due to transplant shock I'd still expect that root to send up more shoots this summer/fall. If you find other segments of roots with no sprouts you can plant those too, they should send up canes. I don't think you will get enough growth this year to get much of a harvest next year but at least they should be established. To me that would be the main goal.

The ideal time to transplant them is probably when they are dormant, just bury some roots. I try to not let the pursuit of perfection stop me from doing what I need to do, some people can always find an excuse to wait. For me the best time to do something is often when I can. If they fail to send up any canes this summer/fall you can always get some more roots this winter and plant them, but I really don't think that will be necessary. If they like growing in your area they will be like a weed. I had to aggressively mow to keep them contained to the row I planted them in.
Thank you for all the info!!! I will definitely go ahead and try to get some started! So I definitely want to look for younger plants. The patch is a bit overgrown as they just moved in. Love to know I could also try the roots as well!

I honestly thought it would take longer to get a harvest from them so that's awesome! I'll just keep getting them from my in-laws till then 😊 I made and canned my first jelly and it just felt so good to have harvested them and made it from scratch!
 
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