Seed starting-Tiny Marigolds and Zucchinis trying to grow flowers?

Celtic_Rumor

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“Necessity is the mother of invention” is an applicable term for gardeners everywhere and a lot of us adapt based on our local conditions.
I’ve read all the hype about this or that not liking to be transplanted and would agree that in a perfect world you should plant everything in it’s intended location; however if you want a crop from any number of vegetable’s in Alaska, adaptivity is essential. Due to the shortness of our season i start and transplant Kale, Chard, Broccoli, Onions from seed, Summer squash, Pumpkins, Cucumbers, Pole beans, Tomato’s Artichoke’s, Anise Hysopp, Dill, Celery and Parsley! Being conscious of “what the plants like”, experience has shown me that Anything i can transplant in the cotyledon stage has a 100% chance for success. As in, “i’ve never lost a plant”. Bear in mind, a lot of these things go directly in #35 pots and only get transplanted when they go out to the Garden as im not a gluten for punishment, the little cups see limited use around here.

I once bought a 10/20 tray of Marigolds, all in those tiny starter trays and they were 6 inches tall and in full bloom when i brought them home. By the time i got them planted out each entire little cup was nothing but a ball of roots! It worked because every-time i watered them they got a strong dose of the liquid nutes added to the water-can.
They are tough, real tough and should be fine.
How short in the season for growing in Alaska? Can only imagine what little you have to work with up there. Is the soil like rocky or is it rich?
 

catjac1975

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“Necessity is the mother of invention” is an applicable term for gardeners everywhere and a lot of us adapt based on our local conditions.
I’ve read all the hype about this or that not liking to be transplanted and would agree that in a perfect world you should plant everything in it’s intended location; however if you want a crop from any number of vegetable’s in Alaska, adaptivity is essential. Due to the shortness of our season i start and transplant Kale, Chard, Broccoli, Onions from seed, Summer squash, Pumpkins, Cucumbers, Pole beans, Tomato’s Artichoke’s, Anise Hysopp, Dill, Celery and Parsley! Being conscious of “what the plants like”, experience has shown me that Anything i can transplant in the cotyledon stage has a 100% chance for success. As in, “i’ve never lost a plant”. Bear in mind, a lot of these things go directly in #35 pots and only get transplanted when they go out to the Garden as im not a gluten for punishment, the little cups see limited use around here.

I once bought a 10/20 tray of Marigolds, all in those tiny starter trays and they were 6 inches tall and in full bloom when i brought them home. By the time i got them planted out each entire little cup was nothing but a ball of roots! It worked because every-time i watered them they got a strong dose of the liquid nutes added to the water-can.
They are tough, real tough and should be fine.
I no longer buy much in the way of plants- I grow my own. One thing I did learn was to never buy plants in bloom. They seemed always to be weak and stunted in the garden.
 

Alasgun

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What we give up in terms of seasonal length, we make up for in daylight. Pretty soon we’ll have 19 hours of daylight if for only a little while. i don’t grow anything “in the ground” but rather in large raised beds both outside and in a greenhouse. They are filled with my own soil mix and amended with compost i generate yearly.
All in all it works pretty well for us.
 

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