Soil disease?

Jane23

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I came out to my garden today and my peas are getting spots. Are they still good? Is it a soil problem? The same thing is happening to my beans. It could also be the low temperatures we have been having.

Any thoughts?

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digitS'

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Fungus diseases are very hard on peas.

Purdue University LINK

Scroll down about half way. The fungi causes must be double anything else. I can't diagnose but if it is pretty white, I call it powdery mildrew. Spots and it's downy mildew.

Keeping the same Spring planted vines beyond mid-July is just about a guarantee of disappointment. Fortunately, sowing seed about then often results in a small crop around first frost.

Steve
 

Jane23

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Fungus diseases are very hard on peas.

Purdue University LINK

Scroll down about half way. The fungi causes must be double anything else. I can't diagnose but if it is pretty white, I call it powdery mildrew. Spots and it's downy mildew.

Keeping the same Spring planted vines beyond mid-July is just about a guarantee of disappointment. Fortunately, sowing seed about then often results in a small crop around first frost.

Steve
These were planted in July. They were not spring plants. It's probably powdery mildew, judging by the white. I will pull them all up by the end of the week. It's only a small section. Is there anything I should do to mitigate it?
 

digitS'

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Here is a list of resistant varieties. Cornell LINK

I have grown Green Arrow, Oregon Sugar Pod & Super Sugar Snap for years.

No problems if I follow that early/late sowing schedule.
 

Jane23

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RIP peas. I guess I won’t be planting them here next year. Too much shade. Plus, it’s going to start snowing on Sunday, so this is it for the year.

Any recommendation on what to add to my soil here to negate the damage for next year’s garden?
 

heirloomgal

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It isn't a soil borne problem, it tends to be related to high humidity and dry roots, and also the onset of cooler weather. I compost all my vines even in a year where some are affected. That pathogen is airborne. Mulching your vines could help, and I think neem oil is effective against it as well.
 

Jane23

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It isn't a soil borne problem, it tends to be related to high humidity and dry roots, and also the onset of cooler weather. I compost all my vines even in a year where some are affected. That pathogen is airborne. Mulching your vines could help, and I think neem oil is effective against it as well.
I am only going to much the ones that are not whitish, just in case. I thought it was because of the weather shifts because we had 80 degrees today, and it will snow on Sunday, so the season is over.
 

flowerbug

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It isn't a soil borne problem, it tends to be related to high humidity and dry roots, and also the onset of cooler weather. I compost all my vines even in a year where some are affected. That pathogen is airborne. Mulching your vines could help, and I think neem oil is effective against it as well.

right, we have so many hosts to powdery mildew around here that it would be impossible for me to prevent it. i don't plant later season peas any more because of how they often get overrun by powdery mildew (and other reasons like i rarely have the time for them with bean harvest season and tomatoes coming on).
 

Jane23

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right, we have so many hosts to powdery mildew around here that it would be impossible for me to prevent it. i don't plant later season peas any more because of how they often get overrun by powdery mildew (and other reasons like i rarely have the time for them with bean harvest season and tomatoes coming on).
I was seriously surprised when I saw the mildew. I know this is specific to this time of year and where I planted the peas. They get too much shade now that the season is turning. It wasn't bad until now, so I nee to treat that bed as a "spring/fall" bed as it just doesn't get the sun the rest of the garden gets. I am still debating what to plant in that spot next year.
 

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