Squash shuffling...

Myrthryn

Attractive To Bees
Joined
Oct 23, 2020
Messages
28
Reaction score
82
Points
58
Location
West Central Indiana
I had enough wind other day that my shelving in the greenhouse was toppled and I had all sorts of mess. Mostly flowers, where the loss was mostly. However, I had two rows of squash six each, Acorn and Yellow Crookneck. Anyone have any idea on how to differentiate them before they get too far along? They are putting out their first true leaves.

My idea is to restart the yellow crook as they require less growing time. Put the other twelve in an area tight, and cull the crooks that show. Any other suggestions?
 

Artichoke Lover

Deeply Rooted
Joined
Dec 31, 2020
Messages
770
Reaction score
1,873
Points
145
Location
North Alabama zone 7b
What variety of acorn did you plant? If the acorn is vining it might pretty easy to tell. Other than that you can check the shape of the female blossoms as soon as they form. Which might be several weeks before they flower.
 

Myrthryn

Attractive To Bees
Joined
Oct 23, 2020
Messages
28
Reaction score
82
Points
58
Location
West Central Indiana
I think it was table queen, but don't recall. Tbh, I think I got these seeds from some squash at a flea market. The acorn and the butternut were only a dollar a piece, so I grabbed a few. ;) I do know that the butternut I have started were from there, as I've got a feeling they are a smaller and quicker variety.
 

Zeedman

Garden Addicted
Joined
Dec 10, 2016
Messages
2,383
Reaction score
6,004
Points
257
Location
East-central Wisconsin
Unfortunately, since both Acorn and Yellow Crookneck are the same species (C. pepo) it will be difficult or impossible to identify the seedlings at an early stage. And if the acorn seeds you planted were from a market squash, you may get some odd-looking squash, due to possible crossing.
 

flowerbug

Garden Master
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
10,837
Reaction score
11,827
Points
357
Location
mid-Michigan, USoA
Unfortunately, since both Acorn and Yellow Crookneck are the same species (C. pepo) it will be difficult or impossible to identify the seedlings at an early stage. And if the acorn seeds you planted were from a market squash, you may get some odd-looking squash, due to possible crossing.

you say that like it's a bad thing! :) ok, kidding aside, for the larger commercial growing operations i don't think they're noted for planting a diversity of types in a single area so perhaps it won't be that much of an issue?
 

Ridgerunner

Garden Master
Joined
Mar 20, 2009
Messages
7,955
Reaction score
8,911
Points
397
Location
Southeast Louisiana Zone 9A
At a flea market I'd be more concerned about cross-pollinated squash than a supermarket chain but you never know until you grow them. Squash are very easy to cross-pollinate. The plants have separate male and female flowers so something has to move pollen for them to develop.

I've grown cross-pollinated squash before, in general the quality wasn't as good as the "standard" varieties but some weren't bad. It will be interesting to see what you get. Good luck with it. May they be pure.
 
Top