tomato fertlizer.

spookybird

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What kind do u use for containers and in ground?
thank you
 

Titan Farm

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When we fertilize with a "in ground" fertilizer we use either Down to Earth Bio-live or Mr. B's Green Trees.
We do use a liquid nutrient mix from General Organic and its there Go Box that I apply weekly.
 

HmooseK

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Years ago, a lady on another forum posted this and it works good for both Peppers & Tomatoes. It's called Mumsey's Mix.

1 handful of bone meal
1 handful of corn meal
1/2 handful of powdered milk
1/2 handful of epsom salts.

This is enough for 3 plants.



The rest of the year, I side dress with tomato tone. You can use cup and 1/2 cup measurements too.


I never tried it in a container
 
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Todd Ziegler

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I think a lot depends on where you live and what your soil is like. I live in Central Indiana (Tipton) and our soil is some of the best in the country. I use a low nitrogen, high phosphorus /potassium fertilizer mix. I start with a 1-1-18 kelp and then add in for the first fertilizing RAW 9-61-0 at half the recommended dose. RAW is the brand name hydroponic fertilizer but I really like the brand but it is expensive. I fertilize them 2 weeks later with same fertilizer mix. In the 4th week or when the tomato plants double in height, which ever comes first, I use the kelp and add in a phosphorus fertilizer without any nitrogen. I only use fertilizer with nitrogen at the time of planting and 2 weeks later after that I don't add any nitrogen to my fertilizer mix. I have had really great success with this method. I alternate between watering the roots and foliar spraying.
 

digitS'

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I'm just back from getting some composted chicken manure (3-2-2) around the tomatoes. Honestly, I'd prefer to use the 7% N organic fertilizer that used to be available. And, composted cow manure has done well for me but it's too many pounds to carry around ...

I've grown tomatoes for several years in pots of about 5 gallon size using straight, home-made compost. Tried it about 50/50 with garden soil once. They were better in compost but, I gotta say, there is a fair amount of soil in my compost.

:) Steve
 

flowerbug

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worms/worm poo/worm pee are my main fertilizers, when i'm inspired i may chop some alfalfa and birdsfoot trefoil to top dress the soil to feed the worms. my worms/etc are from my buckets where i raise them for a year eating up food and paper scraps. i use a few lbs per plant and then rotate plant through that area for a few years before i give it another shot of worms/etc. once in a while i use some wood ashes too.
 

ducks4you

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Compost. A N Y T H I N G but Miracle Gro. It is a chemically manufactured fertilizer and it will need to be reapplied. Compost continues to feed.
Also, if you over fertilize you will have many, many leaves and not too much fruit.
Amend your soil if it is clay and/or compacted. Dig really deep so that the roots can grow and soak up the "puddling" that you should do when you water them. At some point the deep roots won't need to be watered.
Cut the bottom leaves and bury tomatoes up to the top leaves. The missing leaves will grow additional roots. There are a few vegetables that will do this. DON'T do this with peppers!
 
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flowerbug

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What is the average life span of a worm

it depends upon the worm species... red wriggler aka compost worms are rather short lived (a few months to several years), earthworms live longer, night crawlers can go 12-20yrs, etc. i think a reasonable average would be 4-5yrs, but i'm basing that on what i remember from various references. my worm buckets have a mix of worms, i don't count them or sort them out any more. they are getting melon rinds again this weekend they'll be amped up for the garden voyages soon.
 

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