What are these berries? Toxic or not?

margali

Deeply Rooted
Joined
Jun 2, 2011
Messages
171
Reaction score
283
Points
192
Location
Fort Worth, TX area
I'm south of Dallas Fort Worth, Texas. These plants are growing in my sheep pasture. The berries are small about thumb size and turn brown/black as they age. Are they toxic to livestock or humans?
20211105_182309.jpg20211105_182713.jpg20211105_182317.jpg
 

flowerbug

Garden Master
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
10,903
Reaction score
11,948
Points
357
Location
mid-Michigan, USoA
I'm south of Dallas Fort Worth, Texas. These plants are growing in my sheep pasture. The berries are small about thumb size and turn brown/black as they age. Are they toxic to livestock or humans?
View attachment 45165View attachment 45166View attachment 45167

i tried to find anything that looked like that, but have no luck with my searches.

are the sheep eating them or avoiding them? if so that might be a good enough sign to remove them on sight to keep them from being spread around.
 

flowerbug

Garden Master
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
10,903
Reaction score
11,948
Points
357
Location
mid-Michigan, USoA
take some leaves, branches, and berries to your local agricultural extension office and ask them (call first to make sure they're open) - they should know or be able to point you to someone else who can help.

and if they can't help take it to the place where you are getting the sheep from and ask them.

this is what i can think to try further, good luck. :)

me would fence off the area until i knew better or remove if there weren't too many plants.
 
Last edited:

baymule

Garden Master
Joined
Mar 20, 2011
Messages
15,658
Reaction score
22,548
Points
457
Location
Northeast Texas
I don't have those plants here, first time I've seen them. So no help to you. Good call @Pulsegleaner

I do have black nightshade, with small black berries. I pull them up before they get berries on them, but there are always more that come up in the spring. :barnie It turns out, it's the berries that are toxic. I have observed the sheep eating the leaves of the black nightshade with no ill effects. I can't recommend that in this instance because I am unfamiliar with this plant.

Sometimes animals will eat toxic plants at certain times in the season. The reasoning is that they know when it is ok and when it is not ok. Nonetheless, I try to pull up known toxic plants. One plant they never eat is Poke. They never want that! I also research yard plants for being toxic, I won't plant them. Bulb flowers are toxic, daffodils, narcissus, amaryllis, etc. But I have never seen any animal sample them, they must really smell and taste nasty. It's ok, I love the pretty flowers! LOL
 

margali

Deeply Rooted
Joined
Jun 2, 2011
Messages
171
Reaction score
283
Points
192
Location
Fort Worth, TX area
I've emailed my Ag Extension contact but haven't heard back. I will avoid / manually pull as much as possible in sheep areas. Fun thing is wikipedia says they spread by rhizome, ugh.
 

flowerbug

Garden Master
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
10,903
Reaction score
11,948
Points
357
Location
mid-Michigan, USoA
Based on a little online research, I think it's silver-leaf nightshade, Solanum elaeagnifolium. And if it is. then yes, it is probably toxic to livestock.

my searches using "yellow orange fruits" didn't come out well - it never brought up that plant.

my first reaction was also a nightshade, but i never recalled seeing one with that color fruits that ended up turning black. the ones here that are most common are the ones that get green berries that turn black and the flowers are white. having learned my lesson some years ago when i see them i try to remove them entirely before they can drop fruits and spread more. the animals must like them because we find them here or there, but i don't know what animal it might be that most frequently goes for them.
 

Pulsegleaner

Garden Addicted
Joined
Apr 18, 2014
Messages
1,867
Reaction score
2,150
Points
236
Location
Lower Hudson Valley, New York
my searches using "yellow orange fruits" didn't come out well - it never brought up that plant.

my first reaction was also a nightshade, but i never recalled seeing one with that color fruits that ended up turning black. the ones here that are most common are the ones that get green berries that turn black and the flowers are white. having learned my lesson some years ago when i see them i try to remove them entirely before they can drop fruits and spread more. the animals must like them because we find them here or there, but i don't know what animal it might be that most frequently goes for them.
Well, I already looked a little like horse nettle to me so that was a start. I put "Solanum Texas" into the engine, went to pictures, and looked for similar leaves.
 

Latest posts

Top