What are your favorite perennial flowers?

Blueberry Acres

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What are some of your favorite perennials? I need some ideas for my flower garden! (I will also count plants that are technically annuals but re-seed well)
 

digitS'

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I was over on the east side of the house (briefly), today. It is a very good location for hydrangeas. The north side has one that grows bigger every year but doesn't usually have many blooms. A full sun location nearly killed a hydrangea! One thing is the "Winter Interest" factor with keeping the blooms, which is recommended, I guess. Certainly not as attractive after the growing season.

Since DW likes dahlias so well, we have had a lot of them. They require quite a bit of care and I'm not really talking about digging and replanting each year. If it was an annual flower bed, it would be just about the same amount of work and it's not really all that much. Lots of things like to chew on them and that means monitoring what's going on with them and spraying when necessary.

plants that are technically annuals but re-seed well
This afternoon, the neighbor's cat jumped over the fence into another neighbor's yard. It sorta "crashed" into the cosmos detritus. This neighbor likes a landscaped yard but seems mostly interested in paying for her projects, so, I guess, she will have someone in to clean up the cosmos mess. (Fun watching the cat because her response was to "attack" the stalks :D. She may have been mostly playing because, after batting them around a little, she tried to bite one.)

Anyway, I suspect that there will be lots of cosmos volunteers. Well, they grow quickly and tall. That means that they can fill in where taller perennials are spaced apart. This is also true with larkspur. They aren't nearly as beautiful as their perennial cousins the delphiniums but will volunteer and do their part after being transplanted to where they are needed.

Steve
 

Blueberry Acres

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Anyway, I suspect that there will be lots of cosmos volunteers. Well, they grow quickly and tall. That means that they can fill in where taller perennials are spaced apart. This is also true with larkspur. They aren't nearly as beautiful as their perennial cousins the delphiniums but will volunteer and do their part after being transplanted to where they are needed.
Funny, I was thinking about having both cosmos and larkspur (which I have some extra seeds for).
Since DW likes dahlias so well, we have had a lot of them. They require quite a bit of care and I'm not really talking about digging and replanting each year. If it was an annual flower bed, it would be just about the same amount of work and it's not really all that much. Lots of things like to chew on them and that means monitoring what's going on with them and spraying when necessary.
I had lots of dahlias last year, the tubers are all in storage now. They were all lovely last year, although I had to keep a wire cage on them while they were small, so they didn't get eaten. Honestly, digging up the tubers is not that hard, it takes about as much work as weeding and regular maintenance!

Thanks for replying, @digitS' :frow
 

R2elk

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Columbines, perennial Johnny Jump ups, Malva zebrina hollyhocks and Blue Flax.
Columbine_X6057150_06-05-2022-001.jpg

Rocky_mountain_columbine_X6147215_06-14-2022-001.jpg

Yellow_columbine_X6057147_06-05-2022-001.jpg

Johnny_jump_up_XB146408_11-14-2021-001.jpg

Malva_zebrina_hollyhock_X9026346_09-02-2021-001.jpg

Blue_flax_X6025690_06-02-2021-001.jpg
 

Branching Out

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For the first time I grew a few perennials from seed this year, and it was kind of tricky. I had quite a bit of experience growing annual flowers, which seem to take off running after a few weeks. Not so with perennials though; they need pampering for many months as they develop their roots.
Horehound did great once it was established, and I was able to save seed from it; if it spreads too readily this one may come back to bite me. Time will tell. (https://www.quailseeds.com/store/p542/Horehound.html)
Craspedia has been kind of fun to grow from seed. I only got one flower this year, but if I had started them earlier I suspect that I would have had lots of bright yellow balls floating above the grass-like foliage. (https://www.johnnyseeds.com/flowers/craspedia-drumstick-flower/)
I would count pansies is as they often over-winter for us, and sometimes they self-sow.
My favourite this year was Arizona Apricot and Arizona Red Shades Gaillardia. There were not temperamental to get started, and bloomed prolifically in their first year. I hope to start more from seed this spring, and I may divide the ones that I have as well. (https://www.swallowtailgardenseeds.com/perennials/gaillardia/arizona-apricot-gaillardia-seeds.html)
Each of these plants was drought tolerant and deer resistant.
 

Marie2020

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For the first time I grew a few perennials from seed this year, and it was kind of tricky. I had quite a bit of experience growing annual flowers, which seem to take off running after a few weeks. Not so with perennials though; they need pampering for many months as they develop their roots.
Horehound did great once it was established, and I was able to save seed from it; if it spreads too readily this one may come back to bite me. Time will tell. (https://www.quailseeds.com/store/p542/Horehound.html)
Craspedia has been kind of fun to grow from seed. I only got one flower this year, but if I had started them earlier I suspect that I would have had lots of bright yellow balls floating above the grass-like foliage. (https://www.johnnyseeds.com/flowers/craspedia-drumstick-flower/)
I would count pansies is as they often over-winter for us, and sometimes they self-sow.
I was told my pansies would die off completely when winter was with us. They look dead now but they have been there a fair few years. They are little champions
My favourite this year was Arizona Apricot and Arizona Red Shades Gaillardia. There were not temperamental to get started, and bloomed prolifically in their first year. I hope to start more from seed this spring, and I may divide the ones that I have as well. (https://www.swallowtailgardenseeds.com/perennials/gaillardia/arizona-apricot-gaillardia-seeds.html)
Each of these plants was drought tolerant and deer resistant.
 

Blueberry Acres

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Lovely! I am growing some William Guiness columbines this year, as well as some unknown variety from seeds I nabbed off a friend's plant.
I grew perennial johnny jump ups last year, I really hope they come back.

Those hollyhocks are gorgeous, I've never seen any kind like them! I have a double pink hollyhock that is supposed to bloom this year (planted last year).

I love the blue flax. I will definitely look into growing them!
 

Blueberry Acres

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I would count pansies is as they often over-winter for us, and sometimes they self-sow.
I was told my pansies would die off completely when winter was with us. They look dead now but they have been there a fair few years. They are little champions
I am actually starting pansy seeds today! (The same ones that I had a question about in this thread: https://www.theeasygarden.com/threads/can-you-cold-stratify-seeds-for-too-long.25366/ )
 
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