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When to plant tulips?

Discussion in 'Flowers & Roses' started by PlantNurse15, May 17, 2019.

  1. May 17, 2019
    PlantNurse15

    PlantNurse15 Attractive To Bees

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    Hello all,

    I just got some tulips that are almost blooming and I am wondering if it is safe to plant them. The lowest the temperature will be at night is 42 degrees Fahrenheit.

    Thank you!
     
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  2. May 17, 2019
    flowerbug

    flowerbug Garden Addicted

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    are they in a pot?

    if so i think it is best to keep treating them like a potted plant (keep watering if they might dry out too much) until they begin to die back. then let them dry out completely and keep them in mind for where you want to put them back this late summer/fall.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2019
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  3. May 17, 2019
    PlantNurse15

    PlantNurse15 Attractive To Bees

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    They are just in a very small plastic container. Would it kill them if I planted them in the ground this year?
     
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  4. May 18, 2019
    flowerbug

    flowerbug Garden Addicted

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    no, but it may interrupt their growing and by the time they get their roots going again it would then be time for them to start to die back. but if they are overcrowded and in a tiny container then i think you might be better off planting them. another problem is that it is very easy to break the leaves/stems.

    depending upon how it goes they may not flower again the next year but may recover by the year after. all of these complications are why a lot of people just discard bulbs that are forced in pots. in my mind it's a good way to pick up some extra varieties if you aren't in a hurry. :)
     
  5. May 18, 2019
    PlantNurse15

    PlantNurse15 Attractive To Bees

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    Thank you flowerbug! I will have to think about all that a little.
     
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  6. May 18, 2019
    ducks4you

    ducks4you Garden Master

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    As with ALL flowers, flowering shrubs and flowering trees, you should wait until the flowers have fallen off, and the tulip leaves have wilted. You CAN plant them now, but next spring they will not flower for you. Tulips and other Spring bulbs (and other bulbs, period) need to gather strength through their leaves and store it up in the bulb. BY planting you are essentially "transplanting" them from their home in the pot to another location.
    Please make sure to put them in the ground. My neighbor was admiring my slew of tulip bulbs that I had dug up last September, when I cleaned up the front bed. I gave her the biggest bulbs, kept the small to medium ones to replant for 2019. She saved hers to force them. They dried out and died.
    Lesson: Get them into the ground!!! They will be quite safe there and, unless you have a perpetual drought starting in the summer and through next winter, they will not dry out, but reward you with loveliness next Spring. :old
     
  7. May 18, 2019
    PlantNurse15

    PlantNurse15 Attractive To Bees

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    Ok, so just to clarify I should NOT plant them in the ground until they die? They are blooming right now. Will they survive in the container? There are 6 plants in it.
     
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  8. May 18, 2019
    flowerbug

    flowerbug Garden Addicted

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    if they've been growing ok they're fine. keep them watered once in a while and in as much light as they can get.

    when they start dying back then let them dry out, you can then plant them later in the summer or in the fall and they will start putting out roots for the following season once they get wet again.

    remember them though and also where you plan to put them will need to be protected from herbivores.
     
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