Why do you do it?

Zeedman

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Been doing it for so long, I forgot why I started. :old

But I've been gardening just about as soon as I could walk, and most years since (except years I was at sea). There's nothing like fresh vegetables... the feeling of independence that you get from providing part of your own sustenance, the joy of watching things grow, and eating something secure in the knowledge of what is - and is not - in your food. It is a nurturing pastime, as opposed to other less constructive activities which might otherwise occupy my time.

It is also fun to explore new vegetables, new varieties, new techniques - to play citizen scientist. To find just the right varieties, with just the right flavor, and pick them at just the right time. To watch the garden get a little bit better every year, and to share the bounty with friends & family. During peak harvest, those home cooked meals are to die for.:drool

And for me, a large part of my gardening is to grow & share seeds with others.

I'm blessed with a DW who loves gardening as much as I do... I doubt I would be half as involved as I am now, if we did not share that time together. :hugsLove is sitting in front of the TV together, shelling edamame.
 

aftermidnight

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Been doing it for so long, I forgot why I started. :old

But I've been gardening just about as soon as I could walk, and most years since (except years I was at sea). There's nothing like fresh vegetables... the feeling of independence that you get from providing part of your own sustenance, the joy of watching things grow, and eating something secure in the knowledge of what is - and is not - in your food. It is a nurturing pastime, as opposed to other less constructive activities which might otherwise occupy my time.

It is also fun to explore new vegetables, new varieties, new techniques - to play citizen scientist. To find just the right varieties, with just the right flavor, and pick them at just the right time. To watch the garden get a little bit better every year, and to share the bounty with friends & family. During peak harvest, those home cooked meals are to die for.:drool

And for me, a large part of my gardening is to grow & share seeds with others.

I'm blessed with a DW who loves gardening as much as I do... I doubt I would be half as involved as I am now, if we did not share that time together. :hugsLove is sitting in front of the TV together, shelling edamame.

DITTO, couldn't have said it better Zeedman. Gardening really isn't hubby's thing but he helps me with the grunt work and does enjoy the results of my efforts. Gardening is in my blood, it gives me so much pleasure just seeing things grow, it's also a great stress reliever in the crazy world we live in today. I might be sore after a day in the garden but there's nothing like the satisfaction I feel when I've accomplished everything I set out to do.
I don't sit shelling beans with hubby in front of the TV after supper but I usually get a soothing back rub while we watch a rerun of JAG, can't beat that. Then he scoots off to his man cave because I don't relinquish MY remote control, it's mine and mine alone :). In season I spend a lot of time shelling beans in front of the TV, I finally got smart and shell them inside a box, haven't seen the cat playing hockey with them for a long time now, not finding those beans in the oddest places anymore;).
Annette
 

lcertuche

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Gardening is what fed my family when I was a kid. We always looked forward to the green salads, fresh tomatoes, squash, new potatoes, green beans, okra...

In the winter it was the potatoes Daddy grew all summer and a pot of beans with either cornbread or biscuits. We lived on one small income for six children and two adults. We were dirt poor but never realized it as a young child. We played all summer outside, had chickens, went fishing, picked wild fruit and other forage like poke salad. It was a good childhood but I'm sure much harder for Mama and Daddy.
 

aftermidnight

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@Nyboy I had 3 Black East Indian ducks years ago, I hatched 3 eggs out under a banty hen. One drake and two hens, beautiful birds. Poor old Penny their banty mom almost had a heart attack when her babies dove into the dishpans of water I'd put out for them. Lost them one night when a mink got into their pen:hit.

Annette
 
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baymule

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Sous Vide Muscovy duck breast is supposed to be a gourmet delight. I got an extra drake to butcher. The hens grow out to 7 pounds, the drakes to 9 pounds. @Nyboy you might reconsider your choice of ducks! But somehow I can't get a mental picture of you butchering a duck. :lol:


http://www.dartagnan.com/easy-sous-vide-duck-breasts-recipe.html

http://jencaputo.typepad.com/jen_caputo/2012/04/the-whole-duck.html

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/222207/sous-vide-duck-breast/


http://www.foodiemoment.com/2010/01/24/sous-vide-duck/
 

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