2021 Little Easy Bean Network - Bean Lovers Come Discover Something New !

Zeedman

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In 2016 I grew a most lovely little bean. It was a pole type, and I received it from a really dedicated seed preservationist who kept track of bean histories as she collected them. However, for this particular bean she hadn't been able to find very much information, almost none at all. So....I was hoping to post a couple pictures to see if anyone here is familiar with it or knows any of its' history. She goes by the name 'Tarahumara Purple Star'. I originally thought that the originator was @Bluejay77; however, though there are beans carrying the name 'Tarahumara' in the window, I don't see this bean as looking like the others with this name. Perhaps, 'Tarahumara' is a more common bean name in the US...indicating a location perhaps? I do believe this is a landrace type - if that means a bean which will consistently and reliably produce seed coat variations (?). Sorry the photos are old, and they were some of the first bean pictures I ever took, so they have poor lighting.

View attachment 38825View attachment 38826View attachment 38827

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My memory of growing this bean was that is was super productive, and dried up really quickly for a pole. There was possibly a few other variants, but these are the only photos I have. Any insights would be so appreciated!
The Tarahumara are a Native American people indigenous to northern Mexico. I grow a runner bean that allegedly came from them, "Tarahumara Tekomari", that may have a similar origin to yours. This cultivar was apparently introduced to gardeners by Native Seeds/SEARCH. Although all of the seed sent to me by an SSE member was gray, my initial grow out was highly diverse (more so than yours), so I contacted NS/SEARCH to verify whether what I had was a land race, or whether it was just heavily crossed. They verified that Tarahumara Tekomari was a land race. In their response, this is one of three photos they sent me:
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Tarahumara Tekomari (courtesy Native Seeds/SEARCH)

The seed from my initial grow out, in addition to having variable flower & seed color, was also highly variable in seed size and DTM. The plants with the largest seeds & heaviest yield were gray-seeded; and because I intended to use the beans for shellies, I selected for those traits. After 2 more generations, the resultant seed was all "gray" (black spotting over white or purple base). The all-white and purple/black appear to have been eliminated, but may still be recessive; I will rogue out any white-flowered plants as soon as they appear.

I didn't take a photo of the dry beans from the 3rd generation, but these were the shellies:
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flowerbug

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@flowerbug
I would like to ask about your Lemon Slice. I like it very much and I'm curious what is happening with this bean. Is it stable?

it is not super stable, but i am growing it out each year and getting some of them to repeat. the quality of the seed isn't the best depending upon the weather. i'll keep working at it, i'm trying to aim it towards earlier and bush form so as i keep planting it eventually it should cross with all the other bush beans i grow.

unfortunately with the normal light background and color effects that fade and darken in some beans with time this happens to Lemon Slice. :( but i am very happy to have seen it and grown it and like i say i'll keep working on it. if you want a sample sent to you and are having @Bluejay77 send you a package have him include some if he still has them. :) it would be a hoot to say those have made it overseas. :) if you like Huey have him include some of those too, those are much more stable and the form i am after (more bush and early).

haha, funny, sorry @Bluejay77 if you don't really want to do this, it is ok, but i'm amused at the thought for sure. :)
 

heirloomgal

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The Tarahumara are a Native American people indigenous to northern Mexico. I grow a runner bean that allegedly came from them, "Tarahumara Tekomari", that may have a similar origin to yours. This cultivar was apparently introduced to gardeners by Native Seeds/SEARCH. Although all of the seed sent to me by an SSE member was gray, my initial grow out was highly diverse (more so than yours), so I contacted NS/SEARCH to verify whether what I had was a land race, or whether it was just heavily crossed. They verified that Tarahumara Tekomari was a land race. In their response, this is one of three photos they sent me:
View attachment 38843
Tarahumara Tekomari (courtesy Native Seeds/SEARCH)

The seed from my initial grow out, in addition to having variable flower & seed color, was also highly variable in seed size and DTM. The plants with the largest seeds & heaviest yield were gray-seeded; and because I intended to use the beans for shellies, I selected for those traits. After 2 more generations, the resultant seed was all "gray" (black spotting over white or purple base). The all-white and purple/black appear to have been eliminated, but may still be recessive; I will rogue out any white-flowered plants as soon as they appear.

I didn't take a photo of the dry beans from the 3rd generation, but these were the shellies:
View attachment 38845
I am definitely in bean kindergarten compared to all the very experienced growers here, so I can't help but go into amateur hour mode and say WOW @Zeedman those are so, so pretty. They look like Sweet Tart candies or some kind of confection. They almost don't look like they belong to the vegetable family. Incredibly beautiful colour.

There is some similarity in look between our beans, and the only lead I had on them from my friend was that they were from NS/SEARCH. So this is a development. Possibly related or a selected line?
 

heirloomgal

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@heirloomgal
Is Tarahumara Purple Star a runner bean (phaseolus coccineus)? Do you remember if the cotyledons remained in the ground after sprouting?
I recall it seeming exactly like all the other pole beans, there didn't appear to be anything different about it in growing habit. The pods weren't rough, I don't think, and the beans were on the small side. But it's been five years, so my memory of it might be sketchy. I am gonna grow it again this year and pay closer attention. But it does have the colouring of a runner bean doesn't it.

I can't help but express huge thankfulness for this forum, and being able to solicit everyone's refined understanding and experience. This is just so great :) Bean heroes :)
 

Bluejay77

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@heirloomgal,

On your post #88 your beans certainly look to me just like what is called a Runner Bean, Phaseolus Coccineus. If after planting the seed in the soil and when the plants emerge if their cotyledons remain in the soil they are P. Coccineus.

I thought your photos were easy to look at especially when you click on them to view the larger version. Your third and fourth photos in the lower part of your post are interesting. I've never seen coloration on Runner beans quite like that. Very pretty beans.
 

Bluejay77

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haha, funny, sorry @Bluejay77 if you don't really want to do this, it is ok, but i'm amused at the thought for sure. :)
When I finally get what I need for my USDA import account. I wouldn't mind sending Huey or Lemon Slice beans to Artorious along with any trading package that we may have going. I don't know when that is going to take place.

You read heirloom gals refined as refried LOL. That reminds me about 13 years ago I spent a year with my sister in Arizona there was a local street called Ray Road. Sometime I and other people would mistake the enunciation as Railroad.
 
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