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Zeedman

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nosing around definitions and explanations... :)

phaseolin (a globulin (globular protien)) of beans:


Among Phaseolus beans, three distinct types of phaseolins – named after cultivars Tendergreen (T), Sanilac (S), and Contender (C) – have been identified. Screening of 107 cultivars has revealed that S-, T-, and C-type phaseolins accounted for 69%, 25%, and 6%, respectively, of the total cultivars.
The book from which your quote is taken looks interesting, wish I had institutional access. Such material could really stretch my old moldy chemistry knowledge (which totally aside from any other bean info provided, would not be a bad thing).

I do find it interesting that of the 3 bean varieties listed, two of them are snaps. Lacking proper context, their protein content (presumably from dry beans) seems irrelevant, since they will not be eaten that way. Only Sanilac is actually bred for dry use. Perhaps the differing proteins could be used for breeding purposes, or to track lineages?
 
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flowerbug

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The book from which your quote is taken looks interesting, wish I had institutional access. Such material could really stretch my old moldy chemistry knowledge (which totally aside from any other bean info provided, would not be a bad thing).

I do find it interesting that of the 3 bean varieties listed, two of them are snaps. Lacking proper context, their protein content (presumably from dry beans) seems irrelevant, since they will not be eaten that way. Only Sanilac is actually bred for dry use. Perhaps the differing proteins could be used for breeding purposes, or to track lineages?

haha, i'm only working from high school level chemistry class which was 40yrs-ish ago...

your local library may provide access for some scholarly on-line portals, but even if they don't they may let you get inter-library loans of works too, which i have done to get access to some of the agricultural libraries papers.

as for the particulars of this item, no, i can't tell you what those proteins represent offhand whether in the green beans or in the dry, but probably in the dry is a good assumption since with cultivars normally having larger seeds.
 

flowerbug

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@flowerbug
I too enjoy delving rather deeply into topics that interest me, especially garden related. But when I got to the phrase in that article worded something like 'tetramers of polimers...' I had to admit that digesting this would require a prerequisite in chemistry, which is now way too long ago! 😂

the first book is a bit dated (i think their idea that the beans were domesticated in multiple places may not have held up, but this is on-going research so...) i'm reading along, some parts i won't be able to understand, but when i come across something i don't have any intuition about at all then i go off on the tangent and try to at least get an idea of what they're talking about.

i've had a course in botany and a few in biology along with my life time of general science reading so the hard stuff is the old plant part definitions that get casually thrown about which i've forgotten. i have to look those up.

tetramer of polimer shouldn't be too bad, it's some kind of five chunk of a chain of molecules. this being an organic item likely some kind of protein involving carbon (organic chemisty). is that entirely correct? dunno, and at my level of understanding probably not hugely important, but not beyond my ability to go look it up either. my chemistry books here on the shelf are both pretty ancient. the library was getting rid of them so i snagged them as i'd rather have some book on chemistry than none if the zombie apocalypse happens and i need to restart local civilization. :)
 

HmooseK

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Salutations friends. I’ve a quick question. I have a jar of cowpeas from 2011, they are labeled Texas Longhorn. I remember growing them, but they sure appear similar to Red Ripper. I want to grow them out to update my seeds, but I‘d really hate to label something under two different names. Has anyone grown TL and if so, do you think it’s RR or a separate variety. Thanks a bunch.
 

HmooseK

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@Zeedman
Hey buddy, are you growing any runner beans this year? I’m asking because I’ve got a project for you if you aren’t. I need someone to make a grow out for me. I’ve only got three beans and it doesn’t do well in my area, so I hate to take a chance. It’s a bean from Poland that @aftermidnight (Annette) and I along with another member you know (spike) spent quite sometime looking for seed and finally Annette found some. Seed stock is from 2018, but been in the freezer.
 
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Zeedman

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@Zeedman
Hey buddy, are you growing any runner beans this year? I’m asking because I’ve got a project for you if you aren’t. I need someone to make a grow out for me. I’ve only got three beans and it doesn’t do well in my area, so I hate to take a chance. It’s a bean from Poland that @aftermidnight (Annette) and I along with another member you know (spike) spent quite sometime looking for seed and finally Annette found some. Seed stock is from 2018, but been in the freezer.
Hey stranger, where you been keeping yourself? :frowWould that by by any chance be Piekny Jas? I remember there was a lot of discussion about them on two Gardenweb threads (I just went back & re-read them) where we both posted. I too have some seed sent by @aftermidnight , which I have yet to grow.

Gigandes & Insuk's Wang Kong both failed last year (my first runner bean failures ever) so I had planned to regrow both of them... especially since my remaining stock of Gigandes was depleted this year by seed requests. But I was already thinking about holding off on Gigandes to plant Piekny Jas - given all Annette went through to get them. Assuming my seed germinates (it looks healthy) I won't need your seed; but if you want to send it, I would hold it as backup stock in case of crop failure. If that sounds OK, send me a PM & we'll make arrangements.
 

Zeedman

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I finished the soybean germination tests today... and as expected, they were not encouraging. The test was 20 seeds per variety. Of the 19 varieties tested, 4 had 0% germination (all were 2012 seed) and 5 had 25% +/-. The two consecutive years lost to bad weather really took their toll on my soybean collection. :( I still have hope that I can save one or two of the "dead" varieties, using rescue protocols. Soybeans have consistently proven to have shorter storage life than other beans... so while I have never found it necessary to store beans in the freezer, I may need to store soybeans there as backups.
 
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