2022 Little Easy Bean Network - We Are Beans Without Borders

Pulsegleaner

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or "Here, hold my mead!" ... :)

as for milking and such i'm pretty sure that would have been the goats and sheep that were more easily domesticated at first compared to the much larger animals, but once people knew it could be done in any form (from watching mothers nurse) it shouldn't have been too hard to extrapolate... getting animals tamed and domesticated and docile enough to put up with us, well, i'm not able to see completely into the past but there's a pretty good chance we were herders and perhaps nomadic ones at that (moving with the animals to fresh pastureage as the seasons and rainfall changed) so that too would have played some role. also the domestication of dogs as herder companions and animal protection.

if people could not deal well with milk they could however often deal with cheeses and yogurts - you just had to be stable enough to make those things and i'd not be too surprised if some of those were made "on the go".
They did (the fist cheese was believed to result from someone filling a drinking skin made of a calf or kid's stomach (with the rennet still in it) with milk for later.
But even yoghurt and cheese require the ability to handle SOME lactose in order to digest.
 

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Yesterday I shelled the harvest of Beef-bush black resilient beans, grown from seeds sent to me by Jack Holloway. Thank you Jack! The yield was good, and I just love the mix of gold and black with the occasional reddish bean. Other beans that have started to dry down are Dakota Bumble and Rosso di Lucca (shown in the photo); those ones I am harvesting gradually as the pods change colour. Evenings are getting cooler and a bit damp, so the pods had to come indoors to finish drying. I have promised my husband that the coffee table will not be covered in beans for long, and I have offered assurances that the sacks of sea bird guano and worm castings in the living room will be dispatched to the garden as soon as possible. 🤣
 

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Branching Out

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Another bean that I received from Jack is Khabarovsk. Its massive dark purple pods have not dried down yet, however the leaves have turned a lovely shade of yellow that combines beautifully with the green sorghum foliage. I look forward to sampling this Siberian bean. The description says once cooked they taste like 'delicious, creamy potatoes with good beany character'.
 

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