2023 Little Easy Bean Network - Beans Beyond The Colors Of A Rainbow

Decoy1

Deeply Rooted
Joined
Sep 18, 2018
Messages
145
Reaction score
558
Points
157
Location
Lincolnshire. England
The accepted terms in the UK of course are ‘dwarf’ for bush beans and ‘climbing’ for pole beans. I try to use the US terms when on a US forum but sometimes forget! I’m glad you enjoyed it rather than being plain mystified.
If you love Tolkien so much, why are you saying "dwarfs" instead of "dwarves" (remember Tolkien CREATED that plural for the Hobbit) ?

I wonder then, are super short types "petty dwarves"? (Silmarillion joke).


I think it's @flowerbug your comment was intended for. I'm afraid I'm not particularly a Tolkien fan, just a grower of dwarf beans!
 

Branching Out

Deeply Rooted
Joined
Dec 2, 2022
Messages
1,463
Reaction score
4,658
Points
175
Location
Southwestern B.C.
Yes! This is why I grow pole beans too - I don't have much space. I can get so much more bean seeds/pods per square foot with poles vs. bushes. Some years when I see what certain bush beans yield, I ask my self, 'why am I growing this?' That said, the trees I sink in the ground for the poles have given me a number of back aches and limping around mornings.
My husband purchased an auger tool that attached to the end of a rechargeable drill, and it worked really well for digging holes for the thick branched that we stuck in the ground as bean pole supports. He found it very helpful to have a 5 gallon bucket on hand to collect the dirt that came out of the hole; he could place the auger in the bucket and and shake the dirt off before drilling deeper. This was the first time that we tried the auger method, and for us it worked like a charm. We used it to drill about a dozen holes.
 

flowerbug

Garden Master
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
16,092
Reaction score
24,248
Points
417
Location
mid-Michigan, USoA
If you love Tolkien so much, why are you saying "dwarfs" instead of "dwarves" (remember Tolkien CREATED that plural for the Hobbit) ?

because i'm not an English professor like he was. :) when i wrote it i did consider using that but it didn't really feel right for the context in that when you write about pole or bush beans you do not write about poles beans and bushes beans.


I wonder then, are super short types "petty dwarves"? (Silmarillion joke).

:)
 

Zeedman

Garden Master
Joined
Dec 10, 2016
Messages
3,897
Reaction score
11,958
Points
307
Location
East-central Wisconsin
The accepted terms in the UK of course are ‘dwarf’ for bush beans and ‘climbing’ for pole beans. I try to use the US terms when on a US forum but sometimes forget! I’m glad you enjoyed it rather than being plain mystified.
Good thing you didn't call them dwarf French beans, heads would really have been spinning. :lol:
 

Neen5MI

Chillin' In The Garden
Joined
Jan 8, 2023
Messages
15
Reaction score
35
Points
43
Location
lower Michigan
I was reviewing this thread, and dug a little deeper. The 'aka' prefix in Japanese refers to red flowers (and purple or black beans); 'shiro' refers to white flowers (and white beans). Despite Kitazawa's description, the red-flowered trait identifies "Akahana Mame" as Phaseolus coccineus. In my experience, the red-flowered runner beans tend to be fatter, as opposed to the more flattened white-flowered runner beans. I have also noted that red flowered, black-seeded runner beans tend to be sweeter in flavor than the purple. There is a widely circulated heirloom runner bean, "Insuk's Wang Kong", that was grown for use as shellies. Trials by many in the U.S. have shown it to be more heat-resistant than many runner beans. The beans are either purple & black, or all black.

BTW, as someone who collects & grows many Asian beans (including adzuki, mung, hyacinth beans, 60+ soybeans, and many Asian long beans) as well as several edible gourds, I hope you will continue to share your housemate's wisdom & experiences. I suspect we would have many wonderful culinary conversations over the back fence. :)
Thanks for sharing the results of your digging. After receiving the seeds, I don't think we have the real deal. Just too small to be the beans Nobuko is familiar with. Ah well, I'll grow them and try her family recipe with them anyway.

I love to cook, and have fair competence, but I've never lived with a really good cook. It's great fun to watch her in the kitchen. I'd like to be a fly on a fence post, listening to the two of you chat!:)
 

Pulsegleaner

Garden Master
Joined
Apr 18, 2014
Messages
3,359
Reaction score
6,469
Points
306
Location
Lower Hudson Valley, New York
I was reviewing this thread, and dug a little deeper. The 'aka' prefix in Japanese refers to red flowers (and purple or black beans); 'shiro' refers to white flowers (and white beans).
My eyes must have glossed over this line. Can "aka" also mean purple flowers. Because there is something I read once that has stuck in my memory. Someone claimed there were Japanese hyacinth beans that had red flowers (while others said the same variety had purple ones.) If red flowered ones DID exist, that would be interesting since, as far as I know a hyacinth bean flowers are purple, white or a mixture of the two. And I think that type's name also began with "aka".
 

Blue-Jay

Garden Master
Joined
Jan 12, 2013
Messages
3,180
Reaction score
9,779
Points
333
Location
Woodstock, Illinois Zone 5
It was not the best year for my bean growing, but some did fairly well.

In 2019 I got a pole bean from someone called Night Sky and threw off a segregation. I have grown the segregation a couple of time but not always taking photos of it. It has not thrown off any off types. So I decided to name it. I thought what is in the night sky. Well constellations of course and probaby the first one to come to mind and easy to remember is the Big Dipper. So this bean is now called Big Dipper

night sky.jpgBig Dipper.jpg
Pole Dry - Night Sky...................................................................Pole Dry - Big Dipper

This bean (Bobolink) from the state of Maine has been in John Withee's collection of 1,183 beans. I've been growing it for the last several years and the weather has not been cooperating each time I plant it. I haven't had a good cropl of Bobolink probably in about 10 years. 90% of 2023's crop of this bean are in the photo

Bobolink.jpg
Pole Dry - Bobolink
 

flowerbug

Garden Master
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
16,092
Reaction score
24,248
Points
417
Location
mid-Michigan, USoA
...This bean (Bobolink) from the state of Maine has been in John Withee's collection of 1,183 beans. I've been growing it for the last several years and the weather has not been cooperating each time I plant it. I haven't had a good cropl of Bobolink probably in about 10 years. 90% of 2023's crop of this bean are in the photo

i have tried several times to grow pole beans of that shape and seed coat pattern and never gotten a good crop from them. barely hung on is the more apt description.

the best crop from any pole bean that i ever got was from a purple podded bean that did not have a formal name that the person knew who gave me the seeds. i tried later to contact the person through an e-mail address they gave me but i never got a response and have not seen the person again at the seed swaps. so i don't know any other details about it. i sent some of those seeds to @baymule but i don't think she ever planted them before she moved.

of course the first year i grew it there were out-crosses as i was only given tan beans but when i grew it i had some black seed coated beans show up. i don't even know if i have any of them any longer...

Bobolink is a pretty bean and i'd have loved to have gotten it or Frost to grow or to even survive.

the other honorable mention for me and pole beans was a bean called Jumbo which was a striped bean. alas it was just too late for me to grow it. only one year of four it did well. i don't think i have seeds for that one any longer.
 

Zeedman

Garden Master
Joined
Dec 10, 2016
Messages
3,897
Reaction score
11,958
Points
307
Location
East-central Wisconsin
This bean (Bobolink) from the state of Maine has been in John Withee's collection of 1,183 beans. I've been growing it for the last several years and the weather has not been cooperating each time I plant it. I haven't had a good cropl of Bobolink probably in about 10 years. 90% of 2023's crop of this bean are in the photo
Hmmm... both of the pole beans I grew with that shape (True Red Cranberry and Striped Cornfield) did badly this year... and Striped Cornfield has previously been a high producer. Something weird about this year for beans. :idunno
 

Neen5MI

Chillin' In The Garden
Joined
Jan 8, 2023
Messages
15
Reaction score
35
Points
43
Location
lower Michigan
My eyes must have glossed over this line. Can "aka" also mean purple flowers. Because there is something I read once that has stuck in my memory. Someone claimed there were Japanese hyacinth beans that had red flowers (while others said the same variety had purple ones.) If red flowered ones DID exist, that would be interesting since, as far as I know a hyacinth bean flowers are purple, white or a mixture of the two. And I think that type's name also began with "aka".
Nobuko confirms that "aka" refers to red, "shiro" to white, and "hana" to flower. The rest of the name of that hyacinth bean might be revealing. 'Murasaki" means purple, she says.

Ooo, look! She found a link to a source for the real deal!

Ooo, look. Out of stock, year after year.:( Alright, bean people. How can we find this bean?!?!
 
Last edited:

Latest posts

Top