Any Organic Veggie Gardeners out there?

JalapenosinDelco

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Hopefully you saved some seeds.

Peppers, like their relatives tomatoes, have perfect flowers. That means they have both male and female parts and don't really need pollinators to pollinate them. A good wind can do that, though a pollinator buzzing around on it can shake it and cause pollination. Pollinators are still good.

The pepper and tomato male and female parts are shaped so that they usually self-pollinate. Cross-pollination is fairly rare but it does happen. From what I read a few years back hot peppers are more likely to cross pollinate than sweet peppers because of the difference in shapes of the male/female parts.

You do not see the effects of cross-pollination the year that cross-pollination occurs. The first time that will show up is the next year after you plant those seeds. From reading your post I wasn't sure you got that? As long as you don't save the seeds it doesn't matter what they are planted close to.
Very interesting. I did save the seeds, but I seem to have issues regrowing pepper seeds. Like maybe 3% will grow from what I’ve saved. So I’m not really sure how our peppers ended up so damn hot. Thanks for your input!
 

JalapenosinDelco

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When I save tomato or pepper seeds I let the fruit get really ripe so they are fully mature. I'm sure I go longer than I have to but what the heck.

How warm is the soil you are trying to sprout them in? Peppers really like warm soil. Mine germinate at 70 F but they do better if the soil is 75 F or above. 85 is not too warm.
Our home in the winter is around 66 F but I germinate then in seed starter with the clear lid so they’ll probably be closer to 70+. However I have no problem germinating seed from the store. So I think it must be what you said about letting them ripen fully before trying to save the seed. Probably mostly due to eating jalapeños when green, even though they’d turn red when fully ripe. Rarely can wait long enough for that to happen when collecting.
Remember that pepper seeds can be really hot, depending on variety.

Cross-pollinated pepper seeds can be really hot.

Therefore, if you do not take the seeds out in whatever you are preparing in the kitchen, and it is a sweet or mild pepper but crossed, that pepper dish can be hot!

Seed companies sometimes have seed that isn't what it's supposed to be. People doing the hybridizing make mistakes while handling the flowers. Additionally, plants may vary in a field of open-pollinated peppers - and that will mean that the seed will vary but machine harvesting will mix things up.

There are several jalapeño varieties - some with absolutely no heat. I grew some of those once. Mixed them up with the others harvesting. Typical of me but, Naw ... I don't really like not knowing if a pepper is mild or hot while I'm messing around with them in the kitchen.

Steve
i tend to cut a small bit of pepper off the bottom and hold it to my tongue. It’s not 100% but you get an idea of what you’re working with.
Also the heat is stored in the ribs of the pepper too, not just the seeds. Removing those 2 pieces will drastically cut back on the heat.
You can also cook them to reduce their heat. The longer their cooked, the less heat they will emit. IE, eaten raw and whole they will be at their true hottest! 🌶
 

valley ranch

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I’d certainly like to think so!!!!
I guess I meant more what is in the guidelines of what is considered organic gardening...
USDA organic seeds, compost, natural pesticides or insecticides. No Harsh deadly chemicals or chemical fertilizers.
That’s what I’m doing. Was looking for some guidance from people who specialize in this area as I always feel there is room to learn more...especially here with these gardening geniuses!!
There is the dumping of Glyphosate, however you spell it, that leaches from minerals it combines with when again in the presents of water, moves into the water table ~ is then pumped up for drinking, bathing and watering plants and animals ~ There is a price to pay for this, in Parts Per Million ```
 

flowerbug

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what is really scary to me is that the combinations that they are using now and how long they persist and get transmitted to other creatures than the intended targets. i think it is foolhardy and a crime against nature.

unfortunately there are businesses now built up around the practices and it is unlikely that will change anytime soon.

likely the future will look back at this time and consider us ignorant fools and i personally feel this is a vast understatement.
 
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