Baymule’s Farm

baymule

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I hate green briars. The fence line was thick with green briars. So I conceived the brilliant idea of digging up and pulling up as many as I can. That way maybe I won’t have so many of them to come back. I got 7 bucket loads, I’m almost halfway done. I’ve worked all day on this. I pulled, I dug, I machete chopped and I pulled some more. I pulled lots of long roots, they are jointed and every joint can send up a new vine. I got lots of the bulbs they make underground. Tomorrow I’m gonna die. But for every one I pulled up, that’s one that won’t come back.

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I was so sore and tired when I came in. I rubbed Arnicare on my neck and shoulders.

Since it was rainy yesterday I made some coconut shrimp. It was time consuming. I ate half of it yesterday and I ate the other half for my supper. I hate to say it, but restaurants do it better.

The new shoots of green briar are edible. They have to be the green briar with tendrils. No curly tendrils, don’t eat them. I’ve gathered the new tips and sautéed in butter and garlic, tastes like asparagus. BUT I want these GONE!

When they come back up, the sheep will eat them. They love green briars, but not the thick hard thorny vines.

I’ve had a hot shower, I turned the nozzle and just let it pound on my neck and shoulders . I rubbed Arnicare on my neck and shoulders again, it feels better now.
 

SPedigrees

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I hate green briars. The fence line was thick with green briars. So I conceived the brilliant idea of digging up and pulling up as many as I can. That way maybe I won’t have so many of them to come back. I got 7 bucket loads, I’m almost halfway done. I’ve worked all day on this. I pulled, I dug, I machete chopped and I pulled some more. I pulled lots of long roots, they are jointed and every joint can send up a new vine. I got lots of the bulbs they make underground. Tomorrow I’m gonna die. But for every one I pulled up, that’s one that won’t come back.

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The new shoots of green briar are edible. They have to be the green briar with tendrils. No curly tendrils, don’t eat them. I’ve gathered the new tips and sautéed in butter and garlic, tastes like asparagus. BUT I want these GONE!

When they come back up, the sheep will eat them. They love green briars, but not the thick hard thorny vines.

It sound like your sheep will keep your green briar shoots from repopulating.

Your adventure reminds me of my battle with the blackberry brambles with two differences: I was working alone with only hand tools, and my only goal was to forge a new walking trail through this area on the edge of our forest, rather than annihilating all blackberries on the property. I probably still bear the scars. A relative gave me a "Rosie the Riveter" work suit that protected me from getting worse injuries.

For some reason all my blackberries stopped bearing fruit after a few good years long ago when these wild berries were prolific and lent themselves to jam and pies and eating off the bushes. They've never done anything useful since. There used to be trampled paths and bear sign in the thickets, but now these don't seem to attract any wildlife. They bloom each year but only produce a few dried out shriveled berries. I doubt your sheep would eat these.
 

flowerbug

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It sound like your sheep will keep your green briar shoots from repopulating.

Your adventure reminds me of my battle with the blackberry brambles with two differences: I was working alone with only hand tools, and my only goal was to forge a new walking trail through this area on the edge of our forest, rather than annihilating all blackberries on the property. I probably still bear the scars. A relative gave me a "Rosie the Riveter" work suit that protected me from getting worse injuries.

For some reason all my blackberries stopped bearing fruit after a few good years long ago when these wild berries were prolific and lent themselves to jam and pies and eating off the bushes. They've never done anything useful since. There used to be trampled paths and bear sign in the thickets, but now these don't seem to attract any wildlife. They bloom each year but only produce a few dried out shriveled berries. I doubt your sheep would eat these.

established stands will choke each other out. often you will get a really good crop the first several years and then they taper off (similar to how strawberry patches also have to be renewed after a few years to get production back up).
 

baymule

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I’ve been on baby watch since Monday. It’s the first lamb for Granny and she was miserable. I had an appointment Monday and changed it to Friday. No lamb this morning so I changed appointment again, to Monday. I went to a ladies lunch today and had a good time. Got home at 4:00, changed clothes and mixed up dog food. I fed dogs and heard LOUD grunting.

Granny had one foot and a nose sticking out, so I reached in and found the other foot. I pulled it out, then pulled with contractions and PLOP! Granny ran off. Ii moved the lamb to a small pen, gate open. I ran to the house for towels to dry off the baby. I got back and Granny was licking her baby. Good! In a few minutes the baby was on her feet looking for something to eat.

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I sat outside for 2 more hours with a flashlight, making sure she wasn’t having another lamb. It’s a single, pretty sure it’s a ewe!
 

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