Can I split a sky pencil holly root?

Dirtmechanic

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I would also attempt a split if it looked plausible when examining it out of the pot. But it's not something I would advise someone else to do.

When you take the pot off, snap a few pics, I'm curious if it's two plants or if it branches below the soil.
I will. I do not think I will go too far, as it is so damaging to feeder roots when all the soil comes off and the very fine roots go with the soil.
 

thistlebloom

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Plants do recover quickly, and I never worry overmuch when doing a lot of transplants. They don't seem to skip a beat as long as you aren't brutal and they get watered in well. Those fine roots regrow pretty fast.
 

flowerbug

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I would also attempt a split if it looked plausible when examining it out of the pot. But it's not something I would advise someone else to do.

When you take the pot off, snap a few pics, I'm curious if it's two plants or if it branches below the soil.
i agree on both counts. :)
 

Dirtmechanic

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So they still are not in but soon will be.

I have been studying air layering and have a question...

Youtube videos from Herons Bonsai are really interesting to watch. The fellow air layers at a commercial pace. Maples and such as are useful in his arena and I feel like a genius for having watched him air layer his trees.

His technique used stranded sphagnum moss, a piece of newspaper and a piece of clear film plastic so he could see the roots develop. It basically a wrap. He says the stranded sphagnum (the kind that goes in the hanging baskets) is the fastest rooting medium for him. I have seen potting soil and peat and perlite suggested as a rooting medium also. What are you thoughts on the medium?

I could see splitting a tall plastic container with lid and using a powdery medium, because it would be instantly potted and all I would need do is separate the branch.

If the stranded sphagnum is to be used, then his method of rolling the moss around the branch in a wrap style seems more reasonable.

I need to set up for one way or the other.
 

flowerbug

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So they still are not in but soon will be.

I have been studying air layering and have a question...

Youtube videos from Herons Bonsai are really interesting to watch. The fellow air layers at a commercial pace. Maples and such as are useful in his arena and I feel like a genius for having watched him air layer his trees.

His technique used stranded sphagnum moss, a piece of newspaper and a piece of clear film plastic so he could see the roots develop. It basically a wrap. He says the stranded sphagnum (the kind that goes in the hanging baskets) is the fastest rooting medium for him. I have seen potting soil and peat and perlite suggested as a rooting medium also. What are you thoughts on the medium?

I could see splitting a tall plastic container with lid and using a powdery medium, because it would be instantly potted and all I would need do is separate the branch.

If the stranded sphagnum is to be used, then his method of rolling the moss around the branch in a wrap style seems more reasonable.

I need to set up for one way or the other.
if it stays moist and works it would be ok. but perlite makes no real sense in this application so seems a bit contrary. the primary purpose of the plastic wrap is to hold moisture in, being able to see roots would be a secondary thing. after enough experience you probably can just go by time. still would have to check them anyways to make sure they're staying moist.
 
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