Canning Question

ducks4you

Garden Master
Joined
Sep 4, 2009
Messages
5,865
Reaction score
3,256
Points
377
Location
East Central IL, Was Zone 6, Now...maybe Zone 5
Also this:
"After many years of research, it was determined that preheating Ball® and Kerr® lids is no longer necessary. The sealing compound used for our home canning lids performs equally well at room temperature as it does pre-heated in simmering water (180°F)."
https://www.freshpreserving.com/waterbath-canning.html
 

Crazy Gardner

Attractive To Bees
Joined
Jul 19, 2019
Messages
68
Reaction score
157
Points
68
Depending on what it is you are canning, I know for tomatoes, if you don't get enough water out before canning, you can end up with a lot of water after processing. There is a great video out there on how to do that, I'll see if I can find it.

This guy is great, I have pretty much duplicated his entire setup. Bought the tomato squeezer last year, and what a difference it makes to processing times. Can also use it to make apple sauce, or fruit jelly. Only difference is I use really heavy stainless steel pots, a 60 quart and a 30 quart.
 
Last edited:

Ridgerunner

Garden Master
Joined
Mar 20, 2009
Messages
6,687
Reaction score
5,300
Points
377
Location
Southeast Louisiana Zone 9A
I use this rack sitting on the bottom of my water bath/pressure canner. You do not want the jars sitting on the bottom of the canner, that direct contact can cause the jars to break. This raises them enough so its not a problem. Yes, the jars touch each other. That's never been a problem, whether water bath or pressure canning, whether quarts, pints, or jelly glasses. Sometimes pints and jelly glasses are mixed.
Rack.jpg


If you want to overthink it and get technical, it's better for the water you put the jar into to be warmer than the jar. When air warms up it expands. When air cools off it contracts. That's how you get the seal whether water bath or pressure canning. The air (or liquid that turns to steam) escapes through the lid/ring when you are processing. When the jar cools it contracts and creates a partial vacuum, which creates the seal.

With your salsa you probably have a very small head gap, but you still have one. If the water is cooler than the jar, that can cause the air inside the jar to compress, which leaves a partial vacuum. It's possible that could cause some water to find its way into the jar. If the water is warmer than the jar the opposite happens, the air expands and keeps the water out. It's a stretch, I know, but theoretically it is possible. That's why, when you wash fresh eggs, your wash water should be warmer than the egg. If the water is colder, the air cell in the egg could shrink, creating a vacuum and sucking water and maybe bacteria inside the egg. Commercial egg packaging operations make sure the wash water is a few degrees warmer than the eggs.

Egg shells are a lot more porous than the lid/ring fit on your jars. The more difference in temperature inside the jar to outside, the greater the pressure. Also, I assume you wash your equipment and use clean water. I would not worry about the water being dirty any more than I'd worry about eating off the dishes you washed as long as you rinse the soap off. This is something I don't even think about when canning. But if you are searching for something to worry about, have your water a bit warmer than the jars.

To summarize. Since texture isn't an issue I can't see any real reason the water needs to be boiling when you start. Just have the water warmer than the jar.
 

so lucky

Garden Master
Joined
Mar 5, 2011
Messages
8,113
Reaction score
4,476
Points
377
Location
SE Missouri, Zone 6
Another thing: If you are water bath canning in a pot that you don't have a rack for, you can use the lid rings turned right side up on the bottom of the pot. As many as will fit in the pot. The jars may jiggle around a bit in there, but that has not a been problem for me.
Canning takes a leap of faith. Well-researched and much care given, but still a leap of faith that most of us are willing to take. As well as butchering your own meat, making kombucha, lighting a gas grill, wading in murky water. Life is a big gamble, lol.
 

seedcorn

Garden Master
Joined
Jun 21, 2008
Messages
7,903
Reaction score
5,991
Points
397
Location
NE IN
Flowerbug,

Seed, silly question but do you use water in pressure canners? Also, how many pints or half pints fit in there?

My birthday is in a couple days so maybe I'll buy myself a present. ;)

Mary
There are different sizes. You don’t use near as much water so it heats/seals so much faster. Mine is from my mother. Holds 7-8 quarts-don’t remember. She even did meat dishes-safely. It’s just as safe as commercial plus you know what is in your jars-no government allowed droppings, hair, etc.... think there is an old thread on canners.....
 

ninnymary

Garden Master
Joined
Dec 7, 2009
Messages
11,644
Reaction score
9,689
Points
407
Location
San Francisco East Bay
Ridge, I have one of those racks from my old tamale pot. I think I will use that instead of my new canner rack that has handles. The handles fall down and will get in the way of putting the jars in. Thanks for the great tip!

I think this will solve my dilemma and fear of lowering the rack evenly and balanced into the boiling water. That's where my fear is since it sometimes tips every so slightly and scares the heck out of me since the jars may slide.

Mary
 
Top