Chicken eggs are so amazing

Dirtmechanic

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DW has the "potato bug," this morning. She peeled a bunch of spuds and is frying hash browns. It's a little late for my second breakfast but I'm being patient. She doesn't like easy-over eggs. I know that she plans to scramble them. No Sunnyside Up eggs with hash browns in this house! Oh well, I'm trying to be patient ...

Extra spuds, she just boiled and mashed for a couple loaves of bread. I'm not especially taken with potato bread but I've always liked it. Potato bread is just not all that much different from other yeast breads.

Still and yet, I like its smooth consistency - no big gaps in the loaf, making it difficult for the slices to hold the jam ;).

Before that Japanese Milk Bread, I'd never cooked a paste of flour and water as a bread ingredient. I think that is a benefit to the smoothness of the bread just as the mashed potatoes will be. Seemed like a real simple thing to do.

Steve
oh, and there are eggs in the potato bread, too.
Sunny side up on toast please.
 

ducks4you

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Okay, @baymule
Japanese Milk Bread
(recipe)
The Only change I would make is to buy a jar of yeast. I am a bread maker and I am generous with the yeast. Those packages are also more expensive than measuring from the jar.
I clean the empty jars and store seeds in them later. They are dark amber brown and help to keep the seeds away from any light. ;)
 

Dahlia

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but so too are other eggs.

today while fixing my lunch i was peeling a couple hard boiled eggs and thinking about what that egg accomplishes in such a short time if it is fertilized correctly. from a few cells to a little chicken fuzzball of ravenous life.

then i squirted hot sauce on them and said thank you to Momma hen and enjoyed my lunch. :)
Chicken eggs are so great! We used to have chickens and each morning we would go check our hen house and there would almost always be a few small eggs. Some of them blue!
 

Marie2020

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Couldn't find any yeast at all the early part of the year. Can find the packets now, but none in the jars. I like that idea for seed storage!
I'm trying to make a sourdough again, this time I used pineapple to get it going. It's a bit of a process but I've been told it is worth it :)
 
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ducks4you

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My current flock, purchased from a private owner/breeder almost 2 weeks ago, are laying white, pale blue, medium brown and dark brown. The lady that sold them to me has a light in her chicken building to trick the birds into laying during the winter. She also doesn't keep the cleanest coop. Unfortunately, that is normal for many chicken owners. It is also normal for chicken owners to own too many birds, IMHO. Then, they decide it's too much and have a massive sale/butchering, maybe both and give it up.
When Spring comes I will be giving away dozens of eggs/month to my friends, who, in turn, give ME bags of feed. Better than running an egg business and being inspected.
I don't use a light, just a heated dog water bowl. I also have Plenty of ventilation in my always cleaned up coop, although with the high winds yesterday/this week, I closed the two windows and only left the door with the ramp, north side, open.
I will let my birds pack away the calories this winter, put on some more fat and feathers, and accept 1-3 eggs/daily until about March, when I will get more eggs. Chickens have only so many eggs available to lay. I can keep a flock going longer, then butcher 2-3yo's and replace them.
Several of my new birds are only 7 months old, and will grow up bigger.
FORTUNATELY it only took 2 days of throwing them into their coop/shutting them up all night in their coop, for this flock to understand that you go to the coop when it's dusk and stay there until the morning. I THOUGHT it was going to take a whole week to do this.
The coop has plywood pieces to block the wind from the south, west and north. It is on legs and the wind underneath can make it colder.
 

digitS'

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I had sourdough starter for several years, quite some time ago. What I remember was that I often felt compelled to do something with it! It was certainly true that I just wasn't using it for baking often enough.

The solution was to use the starter for pancakes and waffles. I've always been a breakfast person. This was a strong impetus towards these two choices for the meal. I don't even recall that mixing the batter the night before was always felt necessary. Yes, I like sourdough flavor but rotating fresh flour into the starter was also imperative. Buttermilk used to be a very common ingredient, anyway and, either stirring it up the night before or not, I used baking soda in the finished batter. The pancakes and waffles were delicious!

Dad and Mom had their starter for a good number of years. However, Mom was a baker. (She was also the one who taught me to always eat breakfast ;).)

Steve
 

flowerbug

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The Only change I would make is to buy a jar of yeast. I am a bread maker and I am generous with the yeast. Those packages are also more expensive than measuring from the jar.
I clean the empty jars and store seeds in them later. They are dark amber brown and help to keep the seeds away from any light. ;)

if you can find it in bulk the price is often well worth it. for $5 can get 2lbs at Sam's Club. Mom uses a lot of yeast for baking.
 
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