Corn Hunt, 2022

Pulsegleaner

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They ARE popcorn.

The only things in question are 1. Is the corn I found this year at the farmer's market stand the same kind as what is in the picture (to which the answer is most likely yes) and 2. Does the fact that some of the ears I found have some kernels that were dimpled or dented indicate that what I got was crossed with something else, or is such dimpling normal for this variety. As far as I know, in a corn kernel, having a dent more or less messes up being able to pop well (the softer starch is going to be a weak spot inside, so, once heated, the kernel will quickly burst at that point, and not build up the internal pressure to "pop" normally. It'd be like blowing up a balloon with a thin spot; you KNOW where it is going to explode from.
 

Pulsegleaner

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Like I said, a lot of popcorns won't cross with other corns.

I personally find the palette on this one a little bland, but if you like it, grow it by all means.

And yes, you can DM me with questions, just don't be surprised if I can't answer them (I actually DON'T know a lot about corn compared to some other people I know.)
 

seedcorn

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Ha ha….. all corn will cross pollinate. Guessing they state that it won’t is because of pollen shed dates. Pollen share only happens when silking & pollen shed happen together. I can plant sweet corn that sheds early right beside a field hybrid shedding late and NO cross pollination. If it happens at same time, all corn cross pollinated.
 

Jack Holloway

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Ha ha….. all corn will cross pollinate. Guessing they state that it won’t is because of pollen shed dates. Pollen share only happens when silking & pollen shed happen together. I can plant sweet corn that sheds early right beside a field hybrid shedding late and NO cross pollination. If it happens at same time, all corn cross pollinated.
Thanks. What the packs sold for home gardeners doesn't say when the pollen shed is going to happen. Just average time when it is ready to eat. And with popcorns, is it the time when they are dried on the stalk (I usually see around 100 days for popcorn). Not sure if they mention that popcorn needs to dry for months after that before popping (just read that yesterday).
 

heirloomgal

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Thanks. What the packs sold for home gardeners doesn't say when the pollen shed is going to happen. Just average time when it is ready to eat. And with popcorns, is it the time when they are dried on the stalk (I usually see around 100 days for popcorn). Not sure if they mention that popcorn needs to dry for months after that before popping (just read that yesterday).
Yeah, I think the moisture level has to get to about 13% or something close to that. Apparently, some popcorns can be tricky to pop. I've grown Tom Thumb more than any other popcorn, and it's popped for me perfect every time.
 

seedcorn

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Unfortunately there are no laws dictating how “days” are calculated. Some go from planting dates to extreme of popping through soil. Then do they go from black layer (physical maturity) or till it can be picked to eat fresh. Best bet on sweet corn, plant an early variety that will beat field corn-most are mid to late pollinators.

On popcorn, they do test runs for % of popping, size of popped kernel, color, flavor before paying premium or accepting loads. Even with 1,000’s of acres, they understand cross pollination and the effect weather can have. They buy it by the ton, sell it by the ounce-lot at stake.
 

Jack Holloway

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Based on this picture, it seems more or less certain that what I found this year was Indian Berries, and that the floury/cloudy look of some kernels is inherent to the variety, as opposed to being due to some sort of cross (though none of the ears in the pictures seem to show any dimpled or dented kernels, so maybe something is still going on here.)

View attachment 53081View attachment 53082View attachment 53084View attachment 53083
It also appears that either Harlequin and Indian Berries are two names for the same variety, or the latter is a selection of the former.
I went looking for Harlequin and Indian Berries corn seed to buy. Only place I found selling it (called Harlequin vs Indian Berries) was in Serbia. Do you have any suggestions where else they might be available?
 
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