Do they really eat this?

seedcorn

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DD gave her Mom the gift of snacks from different countries. Every 3 months she receives a box with samples. So......
Pickled onion rings? On opening bag, could smell the vinegar and texture of puffed onion rings in little bags like USA.
Lamb/mint potato chips?
 

Pulsegleaner

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Hey, like the British rhyme goes

"Different people have different opinions,
Some like apples and some like 'inions."

or the more common French " À chacun son goût "

Different cultures have different idea of what is "normal" food.

Just going with Potato chips, I often get various ones from spain because they come in flavors like Iberian Ham (basically, Prosciutto) Black Truffle, Raspberry, Caviar and I think Foi Gras. (Note I ONLY eat the ham ones as I don't like any of those other flavors). And there is a British company I sometimes bump into at Home Goods that has flavors like Sausage and Mustard, cheese and onion, and Peking Duck with Hoisin Sauce.

Way back when Snyder's of Hanover (the pretzel people) tried a line of chips with flavors like Coney Island (hotdog and mustard) Sausage Pizza (tasted like Pepperoni) Kosher Dill (though nowadays pickle flavored potato chips are almost normal) Potatoes Au Gratin and Steak and Onion (those were REALLY good).

And Lays has Gyro flavor, among others.
 

seedcorn

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Really? I am up to try most things. Gyro chips? Love gyros. Can’t think a chip is good though
 

flowerbug

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you can blame the chicken and biscuits crackers for all these odd flavors. well at least IMO as there wasn't much at all way back when. :)

i would try any flavor once, but i'd hate to get stuck with a whole bag of potato chips of some flavor i didn't like (especially at recent prices).

an actual gyros recipe which gets close to the old time version where they shaved it off the spit as it roasted would be welcome by me, so far none of the pre-made kinds are acceptable to us (either too wimpy in spices or contain black pepper which we cannot have).
 

Ridgerunner

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I was lucky enough to be able to travel overseas and stay for a while in many different places, both in the army and later with work. Staying in one place and getting to know some locals instead of spending a few nights in a hotel and moving on gives you a different perspective. It's interesting what foods they eat and how it is prepared in some places.

Some people may be familiar with kimchi, a fermented spicy Korean food made primarily from cabbage. It can smell up a room. I ran into other foods prepared much the same way in other places. Fermenting is a good way to preserve it. I'm not sure exactly what the spices contribute other than taste but most foods of that type seem to have them.

When I was in Kazahkstan I made sure I was never the guest of honor at a party. The guest of honor got to eat a real delicacy, the eyeballs. I don't know where that custom came from, maybe some kind of hunting tradition, but getting an eyeball was a special honor. It might be from a goat, might be from a big fish like a sturgeon. I don't know how much vodka I'd have to drink to get one of those down.

But yeah. dog in Korea, pickled herring in Denmark, horse in France, those smoked eels in the Netherlands, certain breakfast foods in Israel, and many things I just don't want to know from a lot of places. I tried many things. Some were good, some like those smoked eels once was too many, and some I just avoided all together.
 

digitS'

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I am very much for simplicity. It's when additions are made especially that experiences can develop into an acquired taste, or not.

They say, an anthropologist is a scientist who doesn't believe in the germ theory of disease. It doesn't quite have to apply to food. Some home cooks anywhere are very conscientious about cooking - everything. And, if boiled in a pot is the way to cook everything, then boiled it is. Rare beef? What are you, some kind of a barbarian?!

Sometimes, it is best to find out sometime later what was in a meal, just to maintain social harmony. Like the time I was able to easily identify the tripe but it seemed that what I was eating with it was a rather strange vegetable. There were smiles when I inquired later from others not at the table about the grass-like green ingredient in the soup. Yep, I had been eating the contents of the cow's stomach. Which of the four, I didn't research further.

Steve 🤠
 

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