Do You Battle a Invasive Plant ? NY Ban Sale of Certain Plants

thistlebloom

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Do I battle an invasive plant, you betcha. Campanula rapunculoides, the evil one,
Oh! I know! Isn't that a horrible plant? I've seen people plant it on purpose and I think, wow, you're sure going to regret that one!

I have found the only thing that slows it down is brush killer herbicide painted on the leaves. I used to pull them, thinking I got it all, but of course it kept popping up all over.
One day I was dividing a plant that the CR was also growing in, and when it was dug up I found this huge horizontal root, about a foot deep, that was shaped like a carrot.
Well no wonder it kept coming back, that one root was sending scouts out all over the place and probably had enough energy to last for years of pulling the top growth out.
Certainly enough energy to wait me out until I had lost enthusiasm for pulling it.
 

digitS'

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Campanula rapunculoides,
Colorado Springs was founded by railroad tycoon, General William Palmer. His wife Queen didn't like living there and after several years, moved on to other Palmer estates. People in Colorado Springs claim she left those campanula weeds. They call them, Queen Palmer's Revenge :).

Herb Robert
I had to go to Wikipedia to find out about that name for the geranium. I was just noticing one blooming yesterday. Or, perhaps it's the geranium @thistlebloom was referring to.

The wood hyacinth does not travel as best I can tell. However! I once said that about Centaurea montana. Boy was I wrong! That stuff may as well be a weed!

And, DW likes the ornamental onions! She should at least stop them from going to seed!

Steve
 

aftermidnight

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Oh Geez, I forgot Centauarea montana, got that one too, forever pulling it out but love the blue flowers so I haven't tried to eradicate it completely.
DSCN5331.JPG

Annette
 

ninnymary

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I love those blue flowers too Annette! I can't imagine having several invasive plants like you to constantly be pulling. Heck I can barely grow mint! @lesa if always warning us not to plant it in the ground but to grow it in a container instead. Well of course I planted it in the ground. The first year it did good but last year not so good. I was tempted to fertilize it! Don't shudder @lesa :D This year thank goodness it's back to doing well. But for some reason it doesn't spread.

Mary
 

so lucky

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I had to look up the Campanula "weed." Very pretty, and the article I read said the leaves, flowers and root are edible. Maybe eating it would be the key to controlling it.
 

aftermidnight

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@ninnymary My mint is also planted in the ground beside my waist high raised bed, been there for years without a problem. "Spearmint" is the variety I have, the last few years it hasn't gone dormant so have been able to harvest it all winter long, maybe that's why it's not spreading.

My soil thermometer went belly up so after phoning all over town we found one place that had one left so we beetled out and bought it, bonus it was 15% off so I got deal.
My soil temps are up to and a little above 60ºF so I'm starting to sprout a few beans (Sacrificial lambs if need be) if these survive it's game on:).

@so lucky they call C. rapunculoides the evil twin because there is another plant Adenophora confusa that is a well behaved perennial, unfortunately the only way you can tell the difference is to pull the flower apart like in the link below. Unfortunately quite often C. rapunculoides is still being sold as Adenophora confusa.

http://www.coldclimategardening.com/2007/07/26/campanula-rapunculoides-the-evil-twin/

This little sketch shows the difference between the two discs
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/424393964861582343/

So if I wanted to buy an Adenophora I'd be looking at one in flower and I'd insist on being able to dissect a flower before it came home with me . Once you've got it's evil twin you'll never get rid of it :(.

Annette
 
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digitS'

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Here is that weed I mistook for @Devonviolet 's plantain on her East Texas weed thread:
IMG_20160407_132833301.jpg
It will grow and have a very different flower than plantain. @Gardening with Rabbits had the picture of the flowers. @Pulsegleaner set me straight that it is a Silene.

It isn't quite a garden weed. As if to make the point, you are seeing it on the edge of my garden and the neighbor's lawn. However, any ground around here that has been disturbed and allowed to sit for a year will be overrun with this stuff! Allow that ground 2 years and it will be overrun with burdock and quack grass. Three years, and we will get back to normal - dandelions ;).

Steve
 

Devonviolet

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digitS'

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The Silene will not remain as a rosette of leaves.

The flower stalks are nothing like plantain.

"Hairy leaves."

:) Steve
 

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