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flowerbug

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Deer have different tastes according to what neighborhood they terrorize. They accustom themselves to what's available.
I told everybody for years that deer won't touch potato tops, :oops:
because they never ate any in my unfenced garden. Then there was the year they mowed them all down and I had to change my thinking.

I read somewhere that deer can even adapt to mildly toxic browse, and eventually it doesn't affect them. I can't remember where I read it so can't vouch for it's validity, but it seems to go along with what I've observed.
Last year in the deer infested neighborhood I work in they ate peony foliage and rhodies, along with a few other things that were traditional "untouchables".
after our 22+yrs of living here i laugh at any plant described as "deer proof", even if the older deer don't like them and won't hit them very heavy that doesn't account for the younger ones who don't know any better... a few dozen youngsters taking test nibbles of a plant and it's pretty much gone.
 

ducks4you

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The wood lasts about 5 years before it starts to rot. If you store it inside off season it will last longer. You might get some bricks to keep the wood off of the floor, stack them, and store on the side of your garage in the off season.
I have done raised beds off and on. When I leave them up all year the soil tends to compress against the sides and in the corners, so I stopped nailing/screwing them together. I like being able to take them apart. I now use wooden garden stakes kinda like these:
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Weather...tual-5-in-x-1-5-in-x-11-5-in-457647/100071727
I pound some on the inside and some on the outside, and then I can tear apart the bed end of season...IF I get to it.
DD's reminded me that with my Salsa party (Salsa 9: PUNNY), and a concert and everything else, October is BOOKED!!!
I also don't have to pick out nails and screws from my garden bed.
When was the last time YOU got a tetanus shot?!?!?! :ep
I made myself a pledge that the next time I have to buy the wood and it ISN'T on clearance at Lowe's, I will purchase plastic covered wood. I forgot what they call it but I have seen it for sale at Lowe's.
https://plasticboards.com/?_vsrefdo...MI8JG30rGl4wIVm7rACh23Hg3TEAAYASAAEgK20_D_BwE
DF, who passed away in 1992, went into paper and plastics (as a Mechanical Engineer) after leaving the jet industry world. (He was an engine mechanic for B-29's in China during WWII.) The plastic industry had begun making this product in the late 1980's, but the idea didn't catch on. Now it becoming very popular bc you don't have to paint or maintain it.
Just some thoughts, but they are a LOT pricier than reclaimed wood.
 
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ducks4you

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I have killed several lavenders bc I planted them where it was too wet. They are Mediterranean and like really well drained soil. Rhubarb likes it wet, at least MY rhubarb likes it wet. Pick one or the other, o r put the rhubarb in a raised bed. Also, SERIOUSLY consider putting annual flowers in with your vegetables. They help with pollination and marigolds will take the insect hit for you. Other flowers work well, too.
 

flowerbug

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I have killed several lavenders bc I planted them where it was too wet. They are Mediterranean and like really well drained soil. Rhubarb likes it wet, at least MY rhubarb likes it wet. Pick one or the other, o r put the rhubarb in a raised bed. Also, SERIOUSLY consider putting annual flowers in with your vegetables. They help with pollination and marigolds will take the insect hit for you. Other flowers work well, too.
raise lavender up and it does ok. we have it next to a spot that floods during heavy rains. blooming now.
 

SweetMissDaisy

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I have killed several lavenders bc I planted them where it was too wet. They are Mediterranean and like really well drained soil. Rhubarb likes it wet, at least MY rhubarb likes it wet. Pick one or the other, o r put the rhubarb in a raised bed. Also, SERIOUSLY consider putting annual flowers in with your vegetables. They help with pollination and marigolds will take the insect hit for you. Other flowers work well, too.
Hi!
The rhubarb is already in that spot and has been for years. It’s right next to a sprinkler head that’s at the edge of the lawn so gets more water than where I’d like to put the lavender.
You’re right about the annuals being great in the garden - I am growing veggies in patio containers until we have the garden fenced, and even in those containers I add annuals to the veggie pots. I love the splash of color they add!
:thumbsup
 

flowerbug

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as a general design tip for any garden with a gate. you want a place to set things on either side of the gate so that when you're carrying something you don't have to bend over to pick it up again...
 
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