GROWING SWEET POTATOES IN THE NORTH

Ridgerunner

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My question is if a sweet potato casserole is a veggie or a dessert?

Mom's way of cooking them was to peel and slice them, then cook them on the stove top, covered, with water and some butter. She'd put sugar on them, so basically cooked and served in a syrup. She would stir them a couple of times so they did not burn.

Just baking them without peeling is a great way to eat them too, maybe with a bit of salt and pepper and a pat of butter.
 

catjac1975

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My question is if a sweet potato casserole is a veggie or a dessert?

Mom's way of cooking them was to peel and slice them, then cook them on the stove top, covered, with water and some butter. She'd put sugar on them, so basically cooked and served in a syrup. She would stir them a couple of times so they did not burn.

Just baking them without peeling is a great way to eat them too, maybe with a bit of salt and pepper and a pat of butter.
It depends on what time during the meal you eat it. haha
 

flowerbug

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It depends on what time during the meal you eat it. haha

i'd eat them for breakfast. with or without marshmallows on top. casserole, with brown sugar, butter and marshmallows is a normal side dish at TG. the rest of the year we just nuke them and have them with butter. rarely any other way. i do love sweet potato fried and potato chips, but i'm trying to avoid stuff like that so i pretend they don't exist. :)
 

Zeedman

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My question is if a sweet potato casserole is a veggie or a dessert?
Desert, if served with melted marshmallows on top - or eaten after the main course. ;) DW will slice & steam a pot full, and snack on them cold for several days. Healthier than potato chips, and really kills the craving for junk food. She really likes the purple ones sold at the local Oriental market (as do I).
 

flowerbug

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oh, and the method of not letting the vines root out too far is also useful for the other issue that someone mentioned where they had a hard time finding all the tubers. if you don't let them wander too far then you cut down the area you have to dig them from.
 

ducks4you

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I don't know.Depending on your climate. I put them out in early June with the soil preheated. And I harden off the slips when I get them before planting. A real cold night can damage them. At that stage the slips are very tender. And the cold even above freezing could be damaging.
However do you preheat the soil? Pretty neat trick!
 

catjac1975

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However do you preheat the soil? Pretty neat trick!
I use black grow cloth. The company that sells the slips recommends using black plastic 2 weeks prior to planting. I think the grow cloth work well enough and helps with weed suppression. Before using it, the first month or so after planting was a nightmare of mulching and weeding, until the vies go crazy. Never enough grass clippings.
 

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