GROWING SWEET POTATOES IN THE NORTH

Zeedman

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You can eat the greens?
Yes. But the greens DW & I grew were grown for that purpose... their tubers were very deep, fragile, and located anywhere within 3' of the plant. :oops: But greens we tried from other varieties had mixed results - the leaves from some ornamental varieties were absolutely horrible. The greens from commercial varieties are probably OK. The flavor can take getting used to, we liked them boiled (which removes some of the bitterness) and served with soy sauce & garlic powder. If you like them, they can be an incredibly productive cut-and-come-again green all summer, getting bushier after each cutting.

Yeah, up late, waiting for my much-too-late coffee to wear off. Shoulda known better... :caf
 

flowerbug

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I am shocked seed corn. You don't want even 1 of your favorites to take a corner of the garden? Store bought are so terrible.

he sure doesn't like tomatoes would be my interpretation. we use between 150 - 200 quarts a year of canned ones alone and that doesn't count how many we use fresh or buy during the off season.
 

so lucky

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I had so much damage from voles and other ground critters that it was hardly worth growing sweet potatoes.
And then finding a nest of black widow spiders when I dug them was off-putting.
Do you not see your plants flowering? They do look like a morning glory flower.
I used the leaves in smoothies and also steamed greens prepared like mustard or kale, perhaps. I didn't plant a specific type for greens. I think they were Beauregards.
Also, when you put out the slips, if you cover each plant with a flower pot for two or three days, it will prevent them from wilting/dying in the hot sun.
 
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