Hardest weed to get rid off.

Wildsky

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journey11 said:
Oh, sandburrs are EVIL. I rented an apt in TX and the lawn hadn't been cared for. They were everywhere! My poor dog would get them in her fuzzy paws (she's a very fuzzy dog) when she went out to potty. They are a nightmare. And they HURT! :hit
my dog gets them and she's not that fluffy - but she's so used to it now she takes them out herself... I even see the chickens get them, they'll stop and lift a foot and peck at it a bit then keep going. They get matted up in the horses tail and mane, so difficult to pick those out.
The kids are always getting them, and they get into the laundry even or on the living room carpet - they're a nightmare!
 

HunkieDorie23

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lesa said:
My father always complained of this too- correct me if I am wrong- but wouldn't the mowed grass have to have gone to seed in order to reproduce in the garden? Grass bits can't grow -can they??
Yes I think so and if seed is that easily spread the fact that it is growing that closely you would get it anyway.
 

digitS'

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Kentucky bluegrass lawn varieties are dwarfs.

I don't cut my lawn especially short but, probably 95% of the spikelets are tall enuf to be removed by mowing. The other 5% goes right to seed. Look closely at your lawn and see if that isn't true on your side of the fence.

There may not be sufficient seed to count as "re-seeding" the lawn but there is enuf that it counts as a little self-sowing.

You know, grass species must be the most successful on the face of the earth. A human with a lawn mower and a sprinkler is just a slave to a grass plant whose only intention is to survive and make more grass . . . .

Steve
 

hoodat

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I'm amazed to be the first vote for bermuda grass. the stuff comes at you from underground in stolons and above ground as seeds. You can't just pull it. You have to dig down and get every bit of the runners too or it will come back. I've seen the stolons a foot or more deep. It will even grow under a concrete driveway and pop up on the other side.
BILLY
 

Rosalind

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Bishopweed. No amount of mulch, and you cannot kill it with fire. I've tried.

Ground ivy/creeping charlie in the veggies. Again, no amount of mulch, plastic, pulling does the trick.

Poison ivy is the only weed I will bust out the glyphosphate bottle for. Fortunately, after two sprayings only on the ivy leaves themselves, it died a quick and merciful death.
 

hoodat

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Thank the Good Lord I was born immune to both poison ivy and poison oak.
 

elf

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I vote for poison ivy/oak, because it's so sneaky and can cause bodily harm. I pulled roots off the tines of my new garden tiller the other day, forgetting I had gone over some short poison ivy, and now I'm remembering it on my right arm and my left arm and my ankle and my chin and my cheek and my other ankle and my neck and......
 

country lady

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Shamrock. I hand sifted a 4x10' raised bed this spring. Every little bulb that could fit through the 1/4" opening is now up and thriving--hate the stuff. I finally got rid of monkey grass.
 

cmom

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I know this is an old thread and my problem is sandburs. Last year I dug out what seems like billions. It was kind of late so some of the burs did drop off. Anyone know of a way to eliminate them. I spent a couple of weeks daily out digging them up. I know they are an annual.

Edited for spelling...
 

Mickey328

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Here it's bindweed and goat head :he Fortunately, the chickens will eat the leaves off the bindweed so it's not a total waste...just wish that would kill the stuff!
 

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