Hello, and HELP

janiceOh

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I have a variety heirloom tomato plant seedlings. All were growing well under grow lights. A week ago I brought them outdoors for a few hours and the soil looked dry so I misted the soil. I know lots of problems here as some water got on the leaves. I noticed days later some leaves were yellowing in spots, then progressing to look almost translucent. There do not appear to be any pests. I have no clue how to save them as I do not know what the problem is. If anyone has any suggestions please let me know. I will try to attach photos...
 

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flowerbug

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it could have just been stress related from moving them. did you put them in direct sunlight? hardening off plants should be done through several days to a week. we put them in dappled shade that gets some morning sun at first and then gradually increase the sunlight.

when you put them outdoors it may also have been that they needed a lot more moisture than just misting them. make sure they get wet enough through the pot and then let them drain completely.

other than that they may survive ok when they get planted out. how far are you away from being able to get them planted where they will finally be growing?

as long as they have some inner leaves that are green and doing ok i would not worry too much.
 

Ridgerunner

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Hi, welcome from Louisiana. Glad you joined.

Those look nice and stocky, not leggy at all. I cannot see the base of the stem. Is it looking like it is turning brown and drying up? I'm thinking about damping off if you are familiar with that. That would be unusual at that stage. It's caused by a fungus and the soil being too damp.

Did the leaves get sunburned or maybe wind damaged when they were outside. Wind is often a problem for me, not just mechanical damage but it can really dry the soil out. That's another thing I'm thinking of, too little or too much moisture. Either they dry out or they drown. Drying out usually means wilting but too wet can also kill.

I don't think they are root bound but if all else fails you might try up-potting.
 

ducks4you

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You could take some of that cardboard from your numerous Amazon boxes from the COVID19 stay at home purchases, and make some guards for them. Shove sticks as deep as possible in the soil, box the tomato in, use string to go around the cardboard. Shove the cardboard into the soil, too.
 

janiceOh

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it could have just been stress related from moving them. did you put them in direct sunlight? hardening off plants should be done through several days to a week. we put them in dappled shade that gets some morning sun at first and then gradually increase the sunlight.

when you put them outdoors it may also have been that they needed a lot more moisture than just misting them. make sure they get wet enough through the pot and then let them drain completely.

other than that they may survive ok when they get planted out. how far are you away from being able to get them planted where they will finally be growing?

as long as they have some inner leaves that are green and doing ok i would not worry too much.
They didn’t start in direct sun, but they did end up in it. Living in Toronto, it will probably be at least 2-3 weeks before they will be outside completely. I grow them in containers so they are easily protected if the weather takes a turn. Thank you for you reply!
 

janiceOh

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Hi, welcome from Louisiana. Glad you joined.

Those look nice and stocky, not leggy at all. I cannot see the base of the stem. Is it looking like it is turning brown and drying up? I'm thinking about damping off if you are familiar with that. That would be unusual at that stage. It's caused by a fungus and the soil being too damp.

Did the leaves get sunburned or maybe wind damaged when they were outside. Wind is often a problem for me, not just mechanical damage but it can really dry the soil out. That's another thing I'm thinking of, too little or too much moisture. Either they dry out or they drown. Drying out usually means wilting but too wet can also kill.

I don't think they are root bound but if all else fails you might try up-potting.
Hi, welcome from Louisiana. Glad you joined.

Those look nice and stocky, not leggy at all. I cannot see the base of the stem. Is it looking like it is turning brown and drying up? I'm thinking about damping off if you are familiar with that. That would be unusual at that stage. It's caused by a fungus and the soil being too damp.

Did the leaves get sunburned or maybe wind damaged when they were outside. Wind is often a problem for me, not just mechanical damage but it can really dry the soil out. That's another thing I'm thinking of, too little or too much moisture. Either they dry out or they drown. Drying out usually means wilting but too wet can also kill.

I don't think they are root bound but if all else fails you might try up-potting.
The stems look sturdy and a normal colour. It was a windy day when they were out, I thought I had them blocked from the wind, but maybe not enough. Also it is the top leaves that I noticed the yellowing so hopefully it is just sun damage. The plants aren’t wilting it’s just the discolouration of the leaves. Thanks
 

janiceOh

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You could take some of that cardboard from your numerous Amazon boxes from the COVID19 stay at home purchases, and make some guards for them. Shove sticks as deep as possible in the soil, box the tomato in, use string to go around the cardboard. Shove the cardboard into the soil, too.
I will try that tomorrow, thank you😃
 

ducks4you

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I would also Not expect them to grow much until you get to summer. Tomatoes are hardy BUT they are native to Central America, much warmer and humid. They don't like 90 degree temperatures and they don't like 50 degree temperatures. They are quick to volunteer each year, but, I don't see volunteers where I live until late June.
Might want to move a few back inside. If you don't have raiding kittens, like I do, they could grow for another month Inside on a window sill.
 

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