Horses? Should I?

baymule

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Buying from a kill pen has its risks. I know and understand that. Before I plunk my money down, I want some answers to a few questions. I’m not being a rude PITA. I’ve owned a couple of business and been in sales jobs. I understand how a business is run-you take care of the customer. If the customer is happy, customer spends their money. I am being ignored. I have tried again, politely, to get some answers. We’ll see.
 

baymule

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@ducks4you You can’t test ride a horse at a kill pen, the liability is too great. They will video one of the employees riding the horse, but not all of them. I have asked, as have others, for a video. Ignored.

I used to get on any horse. If I got thrown off, I just got back on. I don’t bounce now. LOL I know I can’t test ride the horse, but being able to see how he handles would be a great help. This horse has been posted for a month. I just don’t comprehend ignoring someone who wants to buy him. My enthusiasm is slipping away.
 

Ridgerunner

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We bought Pearl out of a kill pen, it was a whole lot more responsive than this one.
You've got to know
When to hold 'em
Know when to fold 'em
Know when to walk away
Know when to run

I know I'm a cold-hearted emotionless monster that should not be giving any advice on this, but there are a lot of other horses in kill pens that have a lot of love to give. You've mentioned how risky kill pens are, I'd suggest doing what you can to set yourself up for success.
 

baymule

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Nothing cold hearted about that. This would be a business transaction. If one party is not forthcoming, there is no business deal. The fact that there is a good looking horse at the center of it, does not cloud my common sense. I can uphold my part of the business transaction, the other party is not.

Time to walk away from this deal.
 

ducks4you

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@Ridgerunner , you are NOT cold hearted. Really you are tender hearted with this advice.
In the next 2 years there will be MANY good horses that people won't be able to $keep.
What you want is sound and safe.
Looks are irrelevant.
If you pay a decent fee for a horse that can be tried by a younger friend that you trust, you can find a good friend.
I assume that you know how to read teeth. MANY 20+yo horses are sold as 12yo's to people.
Since you want another horse I will be praying for you to find your new equine BFF!
The industry has changed. When I bought Corporal as a totally green 4yo (1982-2007, RIP) I didn't know that the meat market folks would often bid on decent horses, train them up and then resale them.
I thought he was gonna be dog food, but he probably would have ended up at another sale later same year, broken in.
For those non-horse people, we use the word "broken" interchangable with "green-broke" or trained with the basics.
Only the fringe beats up on horses. Horses are VERY sensitive. Couple that with very large and heavy, and you can see how people get hurt around them.
They also have the memory of an elephant.
Kindness works every time it is Tried, but IMHO it takes 20x as long to retrain/bring back an abused horse, or one that has become fearful. I am still, in some ways a hothead---I AM a Duck, you know!--but my animals have taught me the value of patience. I am their leader, and my horses crave my positive attention.
They have learned to ignore loud outbursts from me, and from Eva, my GS.
 

baymule

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Yes, if a recession hits like the “experts” say it will, people are going to dump horses. Already round bales of hay are hitting $100 here and feed is up several dollars for a 50 pound bag. It will go higher. This party is just getting started.
 

flowerbug

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Yes, if a recession hits like the “experts” say it will, people are going to dump horses. Already round bales of hay are hitting $100 here and feed is up several dollars for a 50 pound bag. It will go higher. This party is just getting started.

so you may have some sweet horses to rescue who need your love and home. :)
 

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