Joy in the Little Things

Phaedra

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The winter here is always wet, and moss will grow everywhere. Besides 'transplanting' them in my bonsai pots, I am trying another small project.
16274.jpg

We put two such wooden bird feeders among bushes and trees. After two years, all the surface paints are gone. Instead of applying new paints, I am thinking to use moss on the rooftops.
16276.jpg


Mmm, not bad! Let's see how the feeder will look like a few days later.
16273.jpg
 

flowerbug

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The winter here is always wet, and moss will grow everywhere. Besides 'transplanting' them in my bonsai pots, I am trying another small project.
View attachment 63871
We put two such wooden bird feeders among bushes and trees. After two years, all the surface paints are gone. Instead of applying new paints, I am thinking to use moss on the rooftops.
View attachment 63872

Mmm, not bad! Let's see how the feeder will look like a few days later.
View attachment 63873

it will be tougher to keep it looking nice during the dry and hotter spells of the season.

the moss being damp all the time will encourage the wood to rot pretty quickly, covering it with some kind of barrier will not likely help much because that will also trap moisture up against the wood. i guess after it rots you can replace it with some kind of roof that doesn't rot... :) good luck. i also like various mosses that grow here but i find they often don't do great when moved someplace else away from the spot where they've grown.
 

Phaedra

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it will be tougher to keep it looking nice during the dry and hotter spells of the season.

the moss being damp all the time will encourage the wood to rot pretty quickly, covering it with some kind of barrier will not likely help much because that will also trap moisture up against the wood. i guess after it rots you can replace it with some kind of roof that doesn't rot... :) good luck. i also like various mosses that grow here but i find they often don't do great when moved someplace else away from the spot where they've grown.
Yes, I don't want to waste time to repaint the roof now, so using moss to create some interesting 'green buildings' might be fun. I will keep hiding the feeder among trees and bushes, and hopefully, it can be a friendly environment for mosses. :D
 

SPedigrees

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The winter here is always wet, and moss will grow everywhere. Besides 'transplanting' them in my bonsai pots, I am trying another small project.
View attachment 63871
We put two such wooden bird feeders among bushes and trees. After two years, all the surface paints are gone. Instead of applying new paints, I am thinking to use moss on the rooftops.
View attachment 63872

Mmm, not bad! Let's see how the feeder will look like a few days later.
View attachment 63873
That looks amazing, Phaedra.
 

flowerbug

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this is my recipe for a moss roof if you'd like to try it sometime - it will persist and not rot.

use a thin stone slab like slate with ridges in it about an 1cm deep and put down about 3-4cm of clay. the ridges will hold the clay from going away too quickly with gravity. cover it with natural fiber burlap or other porous material. apply mosses thickly to cover. keep moist.

you may also be able to do this in sections like a jigsaw puzzle with different types of mosses for a variety of textures.

if you try it let me know how it goes. :) i am always pondering what i call in my head a moss table and birdbath and the layer of clay and a flat surface is involved in that design, but i've not built it yet. this is based upon my observations of mosses i've grown over the years and what has come up in a few places here and there through my life that i've observed.

yes, it will be very heavy... even heavier with rains or sticking snows.
 
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