Made some bread ```

valley ranch

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Think I've seen it ```

Spelt (Triticum spelta; Triticum dicoccum[2]), also known as dinkel wheat[3] or hulled wheat,[3] is a species of wheat cultivated since approximately 5000 BC.

Spelt was an important staple in parts of Europe from the Bronze Age to medieval times; it now survives as a relict crop in Central Europe and northern Spain, and has also found a new market as a 'health food'. Spelt is sometimes considered a subspecies of the closely related species common wheat (Triticum aestivum), in which case its botanical name is considered to be Triticum aestivum subsp. spelta. It is ahexaploid wheat, which means it has six sets of chromosomes. Since the beginning of the 21st century, spelt has gained widespread popularity as a common wheat substitute for making artisanal breads, pastas, and cereals
 

flowerbug

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Crazy Lady bought me a bread machine. Didn't taste right and tried many recipes. Not sure what it was. Broke that and got a second. Tore the pan up on that one and got a third. They all taste the same.

Bought a kitchenaid mixer with a dough hook and gave the bread machines away. Using the same bread machine recipe mixed in the kitchenaid in a cast iron dutch oven coated with pig grease. I'm happy now. Guessing the Teflon coated aluminum bread machine pans were doing something that the cast iron and pig grease weren't doing. I also coat the dutch oven with corn meal over the oil to keep the bread from sticking. Kind of like the pizza dough cookers do. Works like a charm. Usually the dough falls right out. If the dough was a bit wet going in, you have to coax it out of the pan.

Real butter. Honey or jam. Hot bread, fresh out of the oven. Mmmm!

I try to only cook it when the kids are home to help me eat it. Otherwise, it disappears too quick.

someone gave me a bread machine they weren't using any more and i used it for a few more years before it fried the circuit board, but i mostly used it for making the dough and kneading and sometimes the first rise. beyond that i mostly used the dough for pizza crusts and had quite a fun time experimenting with all sorts of different ingredients. cornmeal bread, bean paste, cheese, spinach, not necessarily in that order... pumpernickel and saurkraut. other ryes, buckwheat, different whole or crushed grains for texture/chew.

that was back when i was hiking 20-40 miles a week on the AT in eastern TN and also swimming miles at the reservoir when the weather permitted.
 

Zeedman

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The bread machines I use were purchased back in the 80's, from a company named DAK (since defunct). If you look up "bread machine" on Wiki, they show a photo. Those were some of the first bread machines sold in the U.S. I originally had 4, but gave one away, and had one break. They make a round loaf, up to 2 pounds or more, depending upon the recipe - and the company sent out 3 books of recipes to anyone who bought the machines! I've had several square-pan machines over the years (most of which were gifts), but none were as efficient at mixing ingredients, or made such a beautiful loaf, as the DAK machines. The aluminum pan on one of them is gradually cracking... which will be a shame, because replacement parts are no longer available.
 

flowerbug

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@Zeedman you may be able to find a used one someplace. i'm sure someone has one in their attic/storage... the one i had was sort of square and tall and worked well enough for baking, but i much more liked using the results for making the pizza crusts so tended to not let it bake.

when it finally fried out i took it all apart and salvaged the glass cover and the large motor and belt it had in there. never know when you may need a generator motor... haha...
 

RUNuts

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Or you could buy a high end mixer. It has a few more uses and takes up the same amount of room as the bread machine. ;)
 

catjac1975

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If you are using regular flour a bread machine is fantastic. My kids still talk about always having homemade bread growing up. It is so easy.
 
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