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majors 2019 first hijacked thread

Discussion in 'Fruits & Vegetables' started by majorcatfish, Jan 1, 2019.

  1. Jan 10, 2019
    Rhodie Ranch

    Rhodie Ranch Garden Addicted

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    I had all cinder block raised beds in Murphys CA. It was way too hot for that type - the blocks roasted the soil terribly, even with news papers over top to try to hold some moisture in. I'm sure it different in the wetter parts of the US.
     
  2. Jan 10, 2019
    flowerbug

    flowerbug Garden Addicted

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    i don't like having things to move around or that get in the way. i would gladly turn every raised bed here into a garden without an edge if i could do it. alas the work is already done and in place. will take a lot of work to change anything but when i can i do combine gardens to make fewer edges.

    when i do need a raised bed in a larger area i just pile up the dirt, step the edges firm and mulch them if i have mulch handy. they'll stay like that well enough until the fall.

    a trench can come in handy between some rows for making picking easier (to not have to bend so far) and to have a place to put debris that will eventually get buried. saves having to dig one later... in the middle of tomato harvest and processing and on a rainy or icky day it's nice to have a spot to dump the peels/seeds/cores and be able to easily bury it without too much effort. the worm farm can't handle that much liquid all at once.
     
  3. Jan 11, 2019 at 12:37 AM
    henless

    henless Deeply Rooted

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    We had treated pine that rotted and was eaten by termites in less than a year. Replaced them with cement blocks. Works great.
     
    baymule likes this.

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