Picture Of The Week (POW) Information & Submissions

Chiknoodle

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image.jpg

Here is a coordination I have. It is a sweet potato vine with a million bells, licorice plant, and some wire heads!
 

dixie

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We've got an exciting new system and process for our Picture Of The Week (POW), so we need your submissions!!!

Your Submissions MUST:
  • Be an image you took & own the rights to
  • Be a sharp, clean, picture that's at least 800 pixels wide
  • Include a short sentence about your picture, e.g., "One of our favorite fuji apple trees in Winter."
  • We prefer "landscape" (sideways) photos, but we'll accept really awesome"portrait"(tall) pictures... we just may need to crop them
Submit your POW by simply replying to this thread and attaching an image :)

We don't have a strict process or time-frame for how/when the POWs are posted, but in general they will be posted to the homepage weekly, and clicking on the POW will bring you to the post within this thread where the image was submitted
Unknown rhododendron in my May 2021 pond garden.
 

thejenx

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A lovely and unique flower. What is it?
Hi Carol, it's purple salsify (ragopogon porrifolius). It sprouted spontaneously in my garden and I'm glad I didn't have the time to care about weeds! The flowers are so pretty.

Tragopogon porrifolius is a plant cultivated for its ornamental flower and edible root. It also grows wild in many places and is one of the most widely known species of the salsify genus, Tragopogon. It is commonly known as purple or common salsify, oyster plant, vegetable oyster, Jerusalem star,[3] Jack go to bed,[4] goatsbeard or simply salsify (although these last two names are also applied to other species).
 

Carol Dee

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Hi Carol, it's purple salsify (ragopogon porrifolius). It sprouted spontaneously in my garden and I'm glad I didn't have the time to care about weeds! The flowers are so pretty.

Tragopogon porrifolius is a plant cultivated for its ornamental flower and edible root. It also grows wild in many places and is one of the most widely known species of the salsify genus, Tragopogon. It is commonly known as purple or common salsify, oyster plant, vegetable oyster, Jerusalem star,[3] Jack go to bed,[4] goatsbeard or simply salsify (although these last two names are also applied to other species).
Thanks for the ID
 

digitS'

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Hi Carol, it's purple salsify (ragopogon porrifolius). It sprouted spontaneously in my garden and I'm glad I didn't have the time to care about weeds! The flowers are so pretty.

Tragopogon porrifolius is a plant cultivated for its ornamental flower and edible root. It also grows wild in many places and is one of the most widely known species of the salsify genus, Tragopogon. It is commonly known as purple or common salsify, oyster plant, vegetable oyster, Jerusalem star,[3] Jack go to bed,[4] goatsbeard or simply salsify (although these last two names are also applied to other species).
I knew it :frow I knew it!! But first, I had to do a search.

Now, I may have some idea about "edible salsify" We have the weed known as western salsify or yellow salsify. There is plenty of it around and it's blooming at the moment. I've known that some folks eat salsify roots. If I pull these weeds, they have the scrawniest of roots. I figured it just grew better somewhere else.

The Department of Agriculture says purple salsify grows to 4.5 feet (1.4 meters) and the western salsify grows to 3 feet (less that 1 meter). So ... I think we can suspect that the roots of the purple salsify is 50% larger that the western salsify, making it worthwhile for harvesting as a root crop.

:) Steve
 

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