Pre-emergents for grasses

Rhodie Ranch

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Now that things are changing here in the household, I'm planning ahead. There is a huge area out front that is full of all kinds of grasses - crab grass, Pua something, some wild pansies, and some real grass. Out back there are small spots of grass. When listing the house and having pro pictures taken next spring, I'll be needing a great looking lawn. I've been reading about pre-emergents. There are various brands, compositions (liquids, granular) and lots of 'advice' on when to apply. Before I rush out to purchase what looks to be an expensive product, does anyone have any suggestions? I also will be using this at the home that I property manage/do the yard maintenance down in Eagle Point as well as the home that I'll be moving into in June. Thanks!


 

Ridgerunner

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I don't have any real experience with pre or post emergents so won't make any suggestions there. But do you know the varieties of the grass you have that you want to keep? That might have a lot to do with which herbicide you want to use. If you don't know what varieties you have you might take some samples to your county extension office and get them to identify them for you and maybe help you know when and how to use them. Local knowledge may help you with that.
 

thistlebloom

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You may be meaning Poa annua (annual bluegrass) as one of those you mentioned.
It is tough to eliminate from lawns apparently, as none of the lawn services at different clients homes have been able to eradicate it, (I assume they make an attempt). It reseeds itself into all the garden beds and is not easy to get rid of there either because it goes to seed so quickly after emergence.

Sorry for the rant with no helpful advice.:hide
 

ducks4you

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Just like in your garden the grasses grow better when they are fertilized. DH learned a long time ago, Too, that mowing down the weeds helps the lawn.
I like to use a bag mower, esPECIALLY on my lawn where I am trying to remove any weeds an their seeds bc the bag captures the clippings, instead of depositing the weed seeds. I have even used my spade and dug up and removed weed grasses.
Further, find out what kind of lawn grass grows the mostly easily for your lawn. Where I live, fescue is recommended bc it can compete with weeds. Yours may be different.
Finally, see if you can get a machine to aireate your lawn. It pokes holes, which come up and are removed as "plugs", and allows the grass roots to spread.
 

seedcorn

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1). Define expensive.
2). Most grass herbicides will kill most-if not all-grasses.

Suggestion-kill all grass in area, frost/snow seed whatever strain of grass you want. Not sure when to do that in Oregon.
 

catjac1975

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Now that things are changing here in the household, I'm planning ahead. There is a huge area out front that is full of all kinds of grasses - crab grass, Pua something, some wild pansies, and some real grass. Out back there are small spots of grass. When listing the house and having pro pictures taken next spring, I'll be needing a great looking lawn. I've been reading about pre-emergents. There are various brands, compositions (liquids, granular) and lots of 'advice' on when to apply. Before I rush out to purchase what looks to be an expensive product, does anyone have any suggestions? I also will be using this at the home that I property manage/do the yard maintenance down in Eagle Point as well as the home that I'll be moving into in June. Thanks!


That lawn looks pretty nice to me. I don't know what your weather is like. Crab grass is an annual that reseeds itself every year. Mine was already dead and I scattered grass seed very heavily on the dead spots about a month ago. We had a lot of cool rain and it is growing like crazy. It already had to be cut. I don't know if seed would germinate now. However, in the spring get a lot of annual grass seed and plant it heavily in any bare spots. It will fill in a look green and beautiful until fall. Truth be told. I doubt a lot of people looking at the house will care about the grass as much as the kitchen.
 

so lucky

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If you have some grass growing, just try to care for that and the weeds can be spot treated with 2,4-D in the spring. We have found that if you cut the grass longer, it smothers out the weeds and looks much lusher. If you cut it short, it gives the weed seeds a chance to catch enough sun to germinate. and the good grass seed will die out from heat and thirst, while the weeds thrive. You can fertilize with a winterizer now, or wait till early spring.
Granular pre-emergents are good if you have a pretty fair stand of grass, are not planning to reseed, but want to keep crab grass from sprouting. That needs to be done early spring. It is only effective for about 6 weeks, so a person can time their reseeding and prevention efforts so as not to overlap.
 

thistlebloom

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I agree with Cat and So Lucky.
I wouldn't spend a lot of energy worrying about making it look like golf course turf. If it's green and lush and looks neatly mowed and edged it will complement the house enough to be appealing from the curb.

Cats probably right about the kitchen making the biggest impression.
 

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