Propagating Roses from Bouquet Cuttings

Blueberry Acres

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I always love the roses that come in bouquets… they make me want a plant of my own! You can easily propagate a rose by snipping a piece of the stem and rooting it in a pot. It’s a wonderful memento of a wedding, funeral, or gift.

I am rooting some red roses from a bouquet. I took some photos and will post my process and continue to update with my results. Excited to share this with you all!

Here's how to do it:
You will need rose stem(s) (obviously!), a sharp, clean cutting tool, a pot with potting or seed starting soil, some sort of rooting solution/powder (I will talk about that later), and a mason/glass jar. A spray bottle is helpful as well, but this is optional.

Here are the roses I’m using:
IMG_1789.jpeg


This is what the stem cuttings should look like. You don’t have to cut them fresh; you can wait until the roses are dying/dead, but the stems must still be healthy. It is important to have one stem node to form roots, and 1-3 to form leaves.
IMG_1836.jpeg


The cuttings should be dipped in something to help root them, such as cinnamon, honey, or store-bought rooting hormone (like this one that I used). I made a paste with all three of these ingredients (no need for measurements, just equal amounts of each) and spread it on the bottom node of the cuttings.
IMG_1838.jpeg


Next, plant the cuttings in a pot of moist soil (I used a peat pot for ease of transplanting). Stick them in far enough so they don't fall over, usually about an inch deep.
IMG_1839.jpeg


Place a glass jar over the cuttings. This will keep the moisture in… like a mini greenhouse! The jar will have to be pressed in relatively deep, so it won’t fall over (which happens often if you’re not careful; these peat pots are quite flimsy!)
IMG_1841.jpeg


I water it by taking off the jar, watering the soil with a spray bottle, and spritzing the inside of the jar before replacing it. I am keeping the jar under a grow lamp with my seedlings, but you can place it by a window as well. Just don't place it in direct sunlight, as it will heat up the jar and roast your cuttings!

I will be sharing my results when the cuttings take root.

Please let me know if you try this... maybe with some Valentine's Day roses? Hint, hint
smile.png
 
Last edited:

Blueberry Acres

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you can put it near a window but you do not want it to get direct sunlight on it or you'll cook your stems. :)
Mine is not directly under the light, I find it gets too hot inside the jar.
Thanks for your input! I'll edit the instructions, too :)
 

R2elk

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I always love the roses that come in bouquets… they make me want a plant of my own! You can easily propagate a rose by snipping a piece of the stem and rooting it in a pot. It’s a wonderful memento of a wedding, funeral, or gift.

I am rooting some red roses from a bouquet. I took some photos and will post my process and continue to update with my results. Excited to share this with you all!

Here's how to do it:
You will need rose stem(s) (obviously!), a sharp, clean cutting tool, a pot with potting or seed starting soil, some sort of rooting solution/powder (I will talk about that later), and a mason/glass jar. A spray bottle is helpful as well, but this is optional.

Here are the roses I’m using:
View attachment 63950

This is what the stem cuttings should look like. You don’t have to cut them fresh; you can wait until the roses are dying/dead, but the stems must still be healthy. It is important to have one stem node to form roots, and 1-3 to form leaves.
View attachment 63951

The cuttings should be dipped in something to help root them, such as cinnamon, honey, or store-bought rooting hormone (like this one that I used). I made a paste with all three of these ingredients (no need for measurements, just equal amounts of each) and spread it on the bottom node of the cuttings.
View attachment 63952

Next, plant the cuttings in a pot of moist soil (I used a peat pot for ease of transplanting). Stick them in far enough so they don't fall over, usually about an inch deep.
View attachment 63957

Place a glass jar over the cuttings. This will keep the moisture in… like a mini greenhouse! The jar will have to be pressed in relatively deep, so it won’t fall over (which happens often if you’re not careful; these peat pots are quite flimsy!)
View attachment 63959

I water it by taking off the jar, watering the soil with a spray bottle, and spritzing the inside of the jar before replacing it. I am keeping the jar under a grow lamp with my seedlings, but you can place it by a window as well.

I will be sharing my results when the cuttings take root.

Please let me know if you try this... maybe with some Valentine's Day roses? Hint, hint
smile.png
When doing similar propagation, I cut the top off of a 2 liter plastic pop bottle and use it instead of a glass jar.
 

digitS'

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I was not offering a caution for a Rhode Island gardener but I worked in a commercial rose greenhouse for some time. Yes, I was one of those people growing and cutting those flowers for the flower shops. During my years there, bushes were pulled and replaced. Sometimes, cuttings were done and those were sent off so that they could be grafted onto suitable rootstock.

Some of the bushes were sold to the public. They went for a very reasonable price but no guarantee. You see, they were very suitable for greenhouses but one aspect to that was that their growing temperature never fell below 60°f (16°C) nor rose above 85°f (27⁰C). Did it mean that they couldn't survive our Zone 5 Winters? Not necessarily but that was for some of them. Honestly, we didn't receive many positive reports back.

Tea roses are from southern China, we are told. Southern China is either in a Cfa or Cfb climate zone, which means temperate with no dry seasons and either hot or warm Summers. Köppen maps

So, where are we? And, how much have these hybrid teas been changed? Well, it varies ... for both. It is a worthwhile experiment. Some commercial cutting roses are absolutely stunning. Don't be afraid to try some of the miniatures – understand that smaller flowers and shorter stems does not mean smaller plants for these commercial varieties. They are vigorous growers and that may translate well for being adaptable. At least, that was my impression.

Steve
 

Carol Dee

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I always love the roses that come in bouquets… they make me want a plant of my own! You can easily propagate a rose by snipping a piece of the stem and rooting it in a pot. It’s a wonderful memento of a wedding, funeral, or gift.

I am rooting some red roses from a bouquet. I took some photos and will post my process and continue to update with my results. Excited to share this with you all!

Here's how to do it:
You will need rose stem(s) (obviously!), a sharp, clean cutting tool, a pot with potting or seed starting soil, some sort of rooting solution/powder (I will talk about that later), and a mason/glass jar. A spray bottle is helpful as well, but this is optional.

Here are the roses I’m using:
View attachment 63950

This is what the stem cuttings should look like. You don’t have to cut them fresh; you can wait until the roses are dying/dead, but the stems must still be healthy. It is important to have one stem node to form roots, and 1-3 to form leaves.
View attachment 63951

The cuttings should be dipped in something to help root them, such as cinnamon, honey, or store-bought rooting hormone (like this one that I used). I made a paste with all three of these ingredients (no need for measurements, just equal amounts of each) and spread it on the bottom node of the cuttings.
View attachment 63952

Next, plant the cuttings in a pot of moist soil (I used a peat pot for ease of transplanting). Stick them in far enough so they don't fall over, usually about an inch deep.
View attachment 63957

Place a glass jar over the cuttings. This will keep the moisture in… like a mini greenhouse! The jar will have to be pressed in relatively deep, so it won’t fall over (which happens often if you’re not careful; these peat pots are quite flimsy!)
View attachment 63959

I water it by taking off the jar, watering the soil with a spray bottle, and spritzing the inside of the jar before replacing it. I am keeping the jar under a grow lamp with my seedlings, but you can place it by a window as well. Just don't place it in direct sunlight, as it will heat up the jar and roast your cuttings!

I will be sharing my results when the cuttings take root.

Please let me know if you try this... maybe with some Valentine's Day roses? Hint, hint
smile.png
Thank you for the instruction. DH got me red, pink, and white roses for Valentine's day simply because he wanted to try propagating them. I will show this to him.
 

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