Propagating Roses from Bouquet Cuttings

SPedigrees

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I was not offering a caution for a Rhode Island gardener but I worked in a commercial rose greenhouse for some time. Yes, I was one of those people growing and cutting those flowers for the flower shops. During my years there, bushes were pulled and replaced. Sometimes, cuttings were done and those were sent off so that they could be grafted onto suitable rootstock.

Some of the bushes were sold to the public. They went for a very reasonable price but no guarantee. You see, they were very suitable for greenhouses but one aspect to that was that their growing temperature never fell below 60°f (16°C) nor rose above 85°f (27⁰C). Did it mean that they couldn't survive our Zone 5 Winters? Not necessarily but that was for some of them. Honestly, we didn't receive many positive reports back.

Tea roses are from southern China, we are told. Southern China is either in a Cfa or Cfb climate zone, which means temperate with no dry seasons and either hot or warm Summers. Köppen maps

So, where are we? And, how much have these hybrid teas been changed? Well, it varies ... for both. It is a worthwhile experiment. Some commercial cutting roses are absolutely stunning. Don't be afraid to try some of the miniatures – understand that smaller flowers and shorter stems does not mean smaller plants for these commercial varieties. They are vigorous growers and that may translate well for being adaptable. At least, that was my impression.

Steve
Surprisingly the little micro mini rose bushes my dad used to send me every year at Valentines Day managed to survive two or three years in my garden when planted outside, because these almost certainly would have been grown in a greenhouse with conditions the same as what you mention. But they were inevitably doomed after a few of our harsh winters.
 

digitS'

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That has been my experience also, @SPedigrees .

The plants that I am more directly referring to are the ones grown for cut flower arrangements.

One thing that is very important to the greenhouses is production outside of the growing season for cut flowers. The season for sales begins with Thanksgiving, then Christmas. It really ramps up on St Valentine's Day. Weddings often occur during Spring months. Memorial Day is important. People just don't put bouquets on the picnic table for the 4th of July barbecue.

Cut flowers are now imported. Sure, California but they are still using protected growing for production. However, there are other places with growing season conditions not all that different from the Winter in a greenhouse. Rhode Island seems like a good choice. Unfortunately, the Wild West really isn't ;).

"A rose is a rose is a rose is a rose" – but it's not. They have been very important plants for a very long time. They are now quite diverse. So. There are rose varieties even here!

Steve
 

SPedigrees

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That has been my experience also, @SPedigrees .

The plants that I am more directly referring to are the ones grown for cut flower arrangements.

Steve
I know, and I expect these propagated plants are even less capable of withstanding cold winters in "non-greenhouse-type living arrangements" than these miniature roses were. Pretty much the only roses that will grow here are rugosa roses and multiflora roses, which is ok since I have both.
 

Phaedra

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Hey, I also enjoy propagated roses and MUMs from cuttings very much. It's challenging but can offer so much fun. During last three years, I got averagely 2-3 roses growing from bouquet cuttings, and most of them were transplanted already.

I usually transplanted them from the second spring instead of the first one, and let them stay in the unheated greenhouse to overwinter. I hope this process can let them gradually get use to the climate here.

So far, the roses transplanted last year are doing well, and I believe they will become more robust this year.

I just propagated a batch last weekend!
16308.jpg
 

Blueberry Acres

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Hey, I also enjoy propagated roses and MUMs from cuttings very much. It's challenging but can offer so much fun. During last three years, I got averagely 2-3 roses growing from bouquet cuttings, and most of them were transplanted already.

I usually transplanted them from the second spring instead of the first one, and let them stay in the unheated greenhouse to overwinter. I hope this process can let them gradually get use to the climate here.

So far, the roses transplanted last year are doing well, and I believe they will become more robust this year.

I just propagated a batch last weekend!
View attachment 63978
Those look great!
 

Zeedman

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Hmmm... I might have to do this just to see if I can, since I have very little experience in propagating via cuttings (DW was the expert on that). That might teach me what I need for a more important project. DW left me some potted Sampaguita (the national flower of Philippines) given to her by a friend who has also since passed away. They have suffered a lot of die back, and need to be re-started as cuttings from the few survivors. One if those is double flowered, and perfumes the whole house when in bloom.
 

flowerbug

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Hmmm... I might have to do this just to see if I can, since I have very little experience in propagating via cuttings (DW was the expert on that). That might teach me what I need for a more important project. DW left me some potted Sampaguita (the national flower of Philippines) given to her by a friend who has also since passed away. They have suffered a lot of die back, and need to be re-started as cuttings from the few survivors. One if those is double flowered, and perfumes the whole house when in bloom.

pretty flowers! :)
 

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