Soil improvement....with sheep.

YourRabbitGirl

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God has really given a wonderful gift this year...a new project! He gave me SHEEP. :weee I'd had them before but it's been some years since then and I never dreamed of having them here, as we have no fencing and really had no desire to spend money for fencing. But, sheep came into the picture with the thought of all the money we spent on repairing mowers this year, added to the trouble of finding an honest mower repair shop, the difficulty of transporting them in to town for repairs, then the months long wait for them to get out of said shop.

It started out being about getting a more sustainable way to mow down 3 acres plus of grass....not good grass, but still enough that we have to mow it all the time. Also, my mother is the lawn master and she's sadly forgetting how to operate the equipment, can't seem to hear if she hits a stump or root and bends a blade at a 45* angle, and has went through 6-7 weedeaters this season alone due to not remembering how to mix the fuel or that the fuel even needs mixed.

Simple, you say....just take over that job for her. Yeah....if only it were THAT easy. :rolleyes: That is my mother's most enjoyable activity in the year and it seems to soothe her when she isn't getting frustrated by not remembering how to work the equipment. Her not being able to do it at all will come sooner than later, but I'd like to let her make that decision on her own.

So, the idea of getting a few head of Katahdin hair sheep~the easiest livestock on the planet to keep besides honey bees~to consume the grass and provide replacements for themselves took root. That way I could slowly fence in most of the areas of the lawn that are prone to damage blades and then slowly but surely fence in ALL the meadow/lawn. That would only leave the areas along our road(1/4 mi. stretch), the absentee neighbor's small lot, another absentee neighbor's driveway borders and all the weedeating in those places. Comparatively small areas next to our lawn/meadow.

Hair sheep are more like goats wherein they thrive on browse, of which we have aplenty with most of our 18 acres in woods, and fatten well on just grass, browse and hay.

Then, along the way, God led me into a deeper use of the sheep by showing me information on mob grazing them with the use of electric fencing paddocks to bunch them into smaller areas and moving them every 2-5 days to the next area so that one could rotate more efficiently through all the pasture area while giving most of it a resting period of 30-60 days between grazing. Not just rotational grazing, but more intensively managed with the goal of soil development, which leads to more variety/diversity of species growing in it. By letting them only take the tips of the forage, while concentrating their manure on the smaller paddocks, it will keep a thicker covering on the soil all year round.

Well, that led to the idea to harvest some of our too large timber~which keep falling or uprooting each year and needing cleaned up out of roads, the yard, paths across the land, etc.~via timbering. By doing so we can remove all the pine and create spaces where the oak, poplar and other deciduous trees are growing to let sunlight into the forest floor in those places. This then creates silvopasture, wherein the sheep can graze the browse that reacts to that sunlight and fertilize all the trees in the process. This will help them produce more food for wildlife, which brings us even more diversity on the land and into the soils.

The money from timbering can pay for fencing and other incidentals related to safe pasturing of these sheep, so it's a win/win all the way 'round. God had given me the gift of 14.5 large round bales of mulch hay earlier in the year~for FREE!~to roll out as mulch and seeding at the same time. Some went in the garden and most on the land. The grass here is scanty, struggling to grow up through the dense moss cover all over the lawn/meadow. Already, under the rolled out hay, I've found the moss is dying or already dead....with the hay composting downward and carrying its own seed with it, I should see some free grass/hay growing come spring.

So, it's all coming together like a good song and I also am enjoying the whole adventure immensely....I LOVE Katahdin hair sheep. I love most everything about them...the way they act, the way they smell(like horses!), the way they look out on the grass and their whole feed thrifty nature. Got a few older ewes at bargain basement pricing, added a ram lamb at regular market prices and just a few weeks ago added two ewe lambs at market prices. Every time I see their fat bodies getting fatter on our too short pseudo grass and all the browse around the border of the meadow, it makes me smile all the way down to my heart.

This year I'm frost seeding a multispecies crop into the garden and letting them graze through it, leaving behind trampled plants, lots of poop and pee, and an exciting boost for the soil there. I'll sow turnips, several different kinds of greens, sunflowers, corn, radishes, wildflowers, oats, red and white clover into that garden and let the sheep work it over for a day or so when it gets a good stand in there. They should be lambing in April, so long about the first part of May would be a good time to let them into that space.

I've already established a relationship with the older ewes, Rose and Shine, then with the ram lamb, Josiah, and am starting on one with May and June, the newer ewe lambs. All are very sweet sheep, though Shine fancies herself the flock leader and can be a little flighty and bossy at times towards Ben or anyone she thinks is threatening her or the others.

Rose is 7 yrs old and had twins last year, but also fostered another lamb at the same time. She's the biggest pet of them all and loves dog biscuits or just about any other food she can mooch.

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Shine...so named because she's so very coal black that her coat shines in the sun like good coal. She's 3 and also raised twins last year.

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May and June, who sadly have docked tails, which is something I'd never do to a sheep, but they have everything else they should have...chunky fat bodies and good room for lambs, good top lines and a docile nature. They are both 7 mo. old.

View attachment 33587

And this is the view I am most likely to see when I pass by them....noses down eating, Jay-Lo butts in evidence...

View attachment 33586

As you can see, we have no grass....we had a long drought time in August and Sept. and Mom had scalped the grass in the middle of it, which never had a chance to grow back before going dormant.

Jo, the ram lamb, who is small now but should be a big boy when fully grown. But, he's got all the equipment and ability to breed even at his young age of 6 mo. He's a sweet thing, but also very moochy about food. That hay they are eating is from those year old, left out in the weather all winter/spring/summer and fall, rotting next to my garden and rolled out there recently....and they act like it's dark chocolate. Eating that down to a nub each day while giving the fresh hay I bought this season and kept under shelter a big ol' no thank you. Figures. :rolleyes: In the back corner of the garden you can see the dog house turned winter duck house...the ducks used it the first night I placed it there, like they'd been waiting for just such a palace. Been using it ever since...they come to the garden gate every night at 6 pm for a bite of supper and to be locked into the garden for sleeping. They are creatures of routine and habit, much like the sheep.

View attachment 33589

View attachment 33588

So, breeding commenced on Nov. 7th and will be going on until all have settled, then we should see some delightfully beautiful and playful little lambs come April. Can't wait!!!!

So, @seedcorn , is this enough to get me off your fecal list of non-posting members? :D
Heres a good article for that...
 

Beekissed

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An update on changes in the soils here:

I'm thrilled to report an increase in clover in the yard~in types, size, size of bloom and overall spread of it in the yard now. I've never seen anything like this before at this place. The trampling, pooping, peeing and also the actual grazing motion~which supposedly stimulates plant growth more than merely cutting does~has started to be realized here.

I've got red and yellow clover here that we've never seen before and the white clover is taller, the blooms larger, as are the leaves. There's one section of the yard in which I've rarely seen clover....it usually has a lot of weed I don't know the name of, a ton of wild onions and even moss....and it's now covered in clovers.

I'm also pleased to report an increase in leaf size, deepening of color, thickness and health of foliage of our apple trees as well. And under those trees the clover has widened and spread past where it usually grows as well. The pasture under the apple trees got some pretty hard use at the last part of winter/early spring...it was overgrazed, over trampled, over worked. It's starting to come back now and will need grazed soon.

I thought we were not going to see any honeybees this year and I've been looking intently for them each day on this clover...and today I finally saw several!!! Very beautiful, healthy looking bees! They've been in short supply in these parts for a long time and I really need to get some of my own~have the hive and all~but haven't had time to actually do so.



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I've never seen our white clover with such tall stems and big bloom heads before.


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First time we've had these little yellow clovers in our yard!


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This part of the yard is usually full of green onions and a little, low growing silvery looking weed and not much grass at all. Now it's full of clover and not a single onion or any of those weeds to be found.

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And happened to spot this pretty little butterfly working the clover, as well as many, many bees.




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Older ram lamb wearing my homemade ram apron. Seems to be working fine!


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And little July, our youngest, is 3 wks old now and loving the clover also.


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Beekissed

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We have more white clover this year. But, I've been trying to keep DH from mowing it all down, lol. I've got a big patch out by my last garden bed. It is always just covered in bees.

July is cute! Which one is he/she out of?
She's out of June, the smallest of the Dorper/Katahdin cross ewes...she was the last born, near the middle of May. I'll raise her up a bit to see what she becomes, but I don't know if I'll keep her for long. The Dorper adds a lot of heft but it also shortens as well as adds more wool to the coat that doesn't want to shed. She is a cutie though....she's the smallest lamb but you couldn't tell it when it comes time to play or fight and I saw her riding one of the older guys yesterday, so she's getting her licks in.
 

Cosmo spring garden

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An update on changes in the soils here:

I'm thrilled to report an increase in clover in the yard~in types, size, size of bloom and overall spread of it in the yard now. I've never seen anything like this before at this place. The trampling, pooping, peeing and also the actual grazing motion~which supposedly stimulates plant growth more than merely cutting does~has started to be realized here.

I've got red and yellow clover here that we've never seen before and the white clover is taller, the blooms larger, as are the leaves. There's one section of the yard in which I've rarely seen clover....it usually has a lot of weed I don't know the name of, a ton of wild onions and even moss....and it's now covered in clovers.

I'm also pleased to report an increase in leaf size, deepening of color, thickness and health of foliage of our apple trees as well. And under those trees the clover has widened and spread past where it usually grows as well. The pasture under the apple trees got some pretty hard use at the last part of winter/early spring...it was overgrazed, over trampled, over worked. It's starting to come back now and will need grazed soon.

I thought we were not going to see any honeybees this year and I've been looking intently for them each day on this clover...and today I finally saw several!!! Very beautiful, healthy looking bees! They've been in short supply in these parts for a long time and I really need to get some of my own~have the hive and all~but haven't had time to actually do so.



100_2033.JPG


I've never seen our white clover with such tall stems and big bloom heads before.


100_2035.JPG


First time we've had these little yellow clovers in our yard!


100_2036.JPG


This part of the yard is usually full of green onions and a little, low growing silvery looking weed and not much grass at all. Now it's full of clover and not a single onion or any of those weeds to be found.

100_2037.JPG


And happened to spot this pretty little butterfly working the clover, as well as many, many bees.




100_2041.JPG



100_2049.JPG



100_2051.JPG


Older ram lamb wearing my homemade ram apron. Seems to be working fine!


100_2052.JPG


And little July, our youngest, is 3 wks old now and loving the clover also.


100_2054.JPG
That looks amazing. I love clover. Since we moved here 4 years ago, more clove is growing in our yard too. What is the reason for the apron?
 

ducks4you

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It depends. If you are fighting other weeds, clover can be your friend. It really fills in. I leave all dandelions and clover. Instead of using herbicide you should fertilize your lawn. EDIT: The sheep ARE fertilizing your lawn. Sorry, had to go back and READ this thread.
The grasses that you prefer will be able to fill in better. If you have a lot of dandelions then your lawn is using up the nutrients.
Clover isn't hard to pull out. I will be pulling clover that has filled in one of my front flower beds. MUCH better than the deep rooted weeds that want to grow there. I throw it on the lawn and make that more fertilizer.
My north pasture filled in with clover after a 3 year drought. My horses were eating a lot of clover there, and their drooling was the indication. Healthy for them.
Now, with more mowing there and 2 years of heavy rain, plus this Spring's heavy rain, and the grass is returning, along with the clover AND I encourage the dandelions, since my horses like the tender new leaves.
I first heard of using more clover on one of last year's This Old House series. They were recommending sod With clover for a new and low maintenance lawn. Here are some articles, food for thought:
 
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flowerbug

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It depends. If you are fighting other weeds, clover can be your friend. It really fills in. I leave all dandelions and clover. Instead of using herbicide you should fertilize your lawn. EDIT: The sheep ARE fertilizing your lawn. Sorry, had to go back and READ this thread.
The grasses that you prefer will be able to fill in better. If you have a lot of dandelions then your lawn is using up the nutrients.
Clover isn't hard to pull out. I will be pulling clover that has filled in one of my front flower beds. MUCH better than the deep rooted weeds that want to grow there. I throw it on the lawn and make that more fertilizer.
My north pasture filled in with clover after a 3 year drought. My horses were eating a lot of clover there, and their drooling was the indication. Healthy for them.
Now, with more mowing there and 2 years of heavy rain, plus this Spring's heavy rain, and the grass is returning, along with the clover AND I encourage the dandelions, since my horses like the tender new leaves.
I first heard of using more clover on one of last year's This Old House series. They were recommending sod With clover for a new and low maintenance lawn. Here are some articles, food for thought:
diversity in planting of any area is likely a huge imrprovement over a monoculture lawn or field. not that they remain that ways for long with the windborne seeds always coming in and the soil seedbank itself rarely exhausted. even after gardening an area for several years in a row and keeping it scraped bare it can still sprout some seeds and capture others from the air along the edges or any obstructions. today i saw poplar fuzz floating in the air and there are maple helecopters all over the place (any wind from the north brings them in the mulched areas and more formal gardens).

what i like about the diversity approach is that you can also mix in more deep rooted perennials and grasses that will survive being grazed (if you allow them to recover by rotating your livestock) and so you can have more green during the otherwise dry times of the year as those deeper rooted plants can really get down there and find enough moisture. alfalfa and birdsfoot trefoil are not normally thought of as yard plants but they can be used as field plants for sure. the thing with the birdsfoot trefoil is that it will take over (some varieties are more aggressive and bigger than others).

alas, there are some really nice looking frondy yarrows (with white, pink and red flowers) that work very nicely IMO in a lawn, but we found out that we both are reactive to yarrow when it is mowed or cut so we've had to weed it out of many gardens (it's still around but not nearly as much as we had before).
 

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