the Seed You Save

flowerbug

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I think that putting the seeds directly in a lump of wax would probably be a bad idea. The wax might get into the pores of the seed coat, and either smother the seed or make it impossible for any water to get in and imbibe it.

Waxed cloth MIGHT work, but I am not sure.

When I was back in college, on occasion when I wanted to put seed away for a VERY long time, once I had put it in the glass vial (I used glass tissue vials for seed storage back then) I would cover the cap with sealing wax or parafilm, but I gave that up pretty soon (for one thing, it is quite hard to get parafilm OFF a plastic cap, and almost IMPOSSIBLE to get sealing wax off.)

ok, so wax on the outside or within another envelope with the wax on the outside and away from the seeds.
 

AMKuska

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Seed that is properly dried, stored in air-tight containers, and kept in a cool location, will have much longer seed life... perhaps much longer than the seed longevity charts indicate. Seed that is frozen in sealed containers can remain viable for decades.
I keep all my seeds in the little paper packets. I didn't realize keeping them in air tight containers would make a difference :eek:
 

meadow

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@flowerbug Waxed paper could work.

My Norwegian immigrant grt grandmother used to make sandwiches for the woodsmen, and used a hot iron to seal them in waxed paper.

An envelope could be fashioned by sealing 3 edges and leaving one end open, to be sealed after filling. That would keep the hot iron away from the seeds.

@AMKuska I purchased 6 varieties of lettuce from a Territorial Seed rack in 2016. Territorial used to package their organic line in small envelopes within the regular seed packet (maybe they still do, idk). 3 of the 6 varieties had this special interior envelope; 1 of those 3 was in a re-sealable plastic bag instead of paper.

Fast forward to today, six years later(!) and kept at room temperature: the only viable lettuce seed was the one in plastic.
 

ducks4you

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Here are some thoughts:
This site has a template for printing:
https://asoutherngarden.wordpress.com/2013/07/21/saving-heirloom-seeds/
I saved THIS to a Word File and I can create my own template from it.
1648828117706.png
 

ducks4you

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I live in a humid environment and seeds exposed to this humidity may sprout and then die. I HAVE to store my seeds where they stay really dry. That being said, I reuse a LOT of ziplock bags for seed storage and I often buy the cheapest ziplock knockoff bags, too, so I have enough.
I have noticed that Many gardeners will store in paper packages, and then house them in a plastic box or plastic sleeves.
 

ducks4you

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I think Anybody can create a template for a paper seed package.
Simply plan on making this on a day where you empty several like sized packages, so if you unwittingly tear too much off, another package will have that portion intact.
Open up and trace around the open package with a pencil, then use a straight edge to mark the fold lines with a dotted line.
Trace over those lines with a BLACK or VERY DARK SHARPIE.
Place your paper on top of your template, secure with paper clips.
Trace with a pencil, pen or extrafine Sharpie, then remove and cut with scissors.
Fold on the fold lines.
LABEL BEFORE ASSEMBLY!!
Use a glue stick to assemble.
I LIKE the idea of using wax paper!
Dunno Why, but America's Test Kitchen is in LOVE with sandwiching pie dough with plastic wrap. :hu I have always used wax paper, and then it goes into my burn barrel, for...later burning.
Plastic wrap takes like 30 years to break down in a landfill.
Regardless, whatEVER material you used to make your packages, you KNOW that they are biodegradable. :love
You could also scan your template and print on colored paper. If you use a dark Shade you will either have to print in Bold, or Trace over the printing.
Scanning would work very well, since you can customize every package.
I know that I have been labelling seeds saved with:
"For 2022", indicating that this is the year that they should be planted.
Although I own this brilliant paperback book on vegetable gardening--my silly mother didn't want to throw it in the garbage, so she gave it to ME, which was her habit--but every vegetable has a chart of germination efficacy by year(s). Certain vegetables, like onions, are only good for about 1 year. Others, like beans, will still grow after many years have gone by.
I like the format of the template I posted. It will remind you of things, like:
1) FULL SUN, REALLY NEEDS IT!!
2) Don't plant under the garage eves. They will rot! (This is what I did with my 2021 potatoes!)
3) Don't plant in the ground early. Tomatoes and peppers will freeze to death if you do this.
Seed Type

Date Collected

Collected From

Notes:
 
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ducks4you

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One more thing, if you want color, I suggest colored paper. I run a business along with DH who sometimes needs colored prints for exhibits in court.
Nobody thinks about how quickly you run through COLOR toners, and inks for inkjets cost close to $100.00 or more for name brand. If you only use an inkjet color printer every once in awhile and you don't take the ink cartridge out to store in a ziplock bag, it will dry out. Color laser toners don't do that, which is why I prefer them.
I have tried, or seen somebody else try using refurbished.
Refurbished toners smear and leak toner powder.
Refurbished ink cartridges bleed all over your hand.
500 sheets of colored paper isn't too expensive, about $14.00, right now
You could decorate, or get your kiddos going with your seed packages, or make a decorative or several templates to draw on your seed packets. Maybe even use crayons on them.
I own 7 printers total, DH's office and home. I still use a 15yo HP laser printer, my backup. It cannot handle 150 pages straight, but 10 at a time isn't a hardship. The black toner came out of it's 10yo packaging in 2021, when the 2010 toner finally ran out.
 
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