This fall’s mint

Ridgerunner

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I must be the only person I the world that has killed my mind oregano and thyme :(
I had some oregano in a landscaping bed that flooded a lot. The oregano lasted maybe three years then died. My oregano in a well drained spot in the garden did not die. I had to use a shovel annually to trim it back to where it should be.

I've also killed thyme. I had some in the garden that lasted maybe five years, then one spring it did not come back. Not sure what caused that. It was never that vigorous but it provided what I needed. Then it didn't.

Marie you are not the only one that has killed oregano and thyme,
 

AMKuska

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@AMKuska Any of the home grown mint’s are better than store bought; the Mojito has a bigger leaf than pepper and chocolate mint, is the most prolific of the mints we grow and is right up there with Anise Hyssop And Chocolate in our preference. Now, trying to describe the flavor, id say it has a more full flavored, complex taste. A bold enough taste, you know what your drinking. Some mints like Apple for example are pretty bland. There’s lots of them and growing methods will impact the taste; these are the ones we’ve kept over the years and they produce well for us, store well and we dont need an acre to supply our yearly tea stock. The mojito bed is roughly 6 square ft, the chocolate & pepper roughly 3 sq ft each and the Anise Hyssop is getting it’s own 3x8 bed this year!

now bear in mind; these descriptions are coming from the guy who makes his own rabbit piss wine!😳

Well...perhaps the mint is showing its appreciation for a glass of "wine" with full bodied flavor of its own? Haha!

I just have a pot of chamomile and a pot of an unknown mint right now. My neighbor gave me the mint. :) I plan to just drink tea though so looking for options.
 

Alasgun

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Chamomile can be a wild villainous herb if you plant it out somewhere. Once established, we’ve never had it fail. It makes the best eye drops we’ve ever found, itchy allergic eyes, weld flash burned eyes; it‘s never failed in that respect either. And of course, it’s pretty fair tea too.
 

Artichoke Lover

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I must be the only person I the world that has killed my mind oregano and thyme :(
I’m sure you aren’t the only person. I believe you are from the other side of the pond. England specifically is known for having clay soil and lots of rain. Most herbs don’t tolerate wet feet so that may be your problem.
 

ducks4you

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I have a tiny bit of peppermint, maybe it's spearmint left. I have TONS of chocolate mint.
I used to see so many varieties of mint that I wanted to try, but didn't get to, like pineapple mint.
If you haven't tried them, they REALLY DO smell/taste like the description.
I know that my chocolate mint SMELLS like chocolate.
 

Marie2020

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I’m sure you aren’t the only person. I believe you are from the other side of the pond. England specifically is known for having clay soil and lots of rain. Most herbs don’t tolerate wet feet so that may be your problem.
You are so sweet too say this. :) I really have to find a way to keep these important plants. I kill spider plants too :( they hate me
 

Alasgun

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@calebgilk , not only to decorate! We grow Chocolate mint which not only is a favorite tea mint but we use it in Mexican food (tacos), in salad and as a garnish for Salmon.
We also grow Mojito mint and Anise Hyssop which are excellent tea mints and i‘d have no qualms about using either of them in cooked dishes, deserts etc.
play around a little and decide how you like it. We prefer fresh mint sprigs for any cooked dish and dried mint for teas.
We keep a pot of Chocolate mint and a pot or Rosemary going thru the winter just for these purposes. Start with a little and go from there. 2 TBLS of dried mint will make a full pot of tea for 2-3 people, 1 mint sprig 4 inches long and chopped well, will add that special hint of flavor to your tacos etc.
 

Marie2020

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@calebgilk , not only to decorate! We grow Chocolate mint which not only is a favorite tea mint but we use it in Mexican food (tacos), in salad and as a garnish for Salmon.
We also grow Mojito mint and Anise Hyssop which are excellent tea mints and i‘d have no qualms about using either of them in cooked dishes, deserts etc.
play around a little and decide how you like it. We prefer fresh mint sprigs for any cooked dish and dried mint for teas.
We keep a pot of Chocolate mint and a pot or Rosemary going thru the winter just for these purposes. Start with a little and go from there. 2 TBLS of dried mint will make a full pot of tea for 2-3 people, 1 mint sprig 4 inches long and chopped well, will add that special hint of flavor to your tacos etc.
I have a little potted mint I would like too plant it into my abandoned rockery. But I've planted wormwood there for now do you think would this kill the mint?
 

Alasgun

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@Marie2020 , not knowing much about wormwood i have no comment on that; however, over the years we’ve grown a half dozen various mints and find them quite hardy!
 

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