Tomatoe Cages

ducks4you

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Did I miss something? Ducks, no one said anything about cementing anything in. We are referring to tomato cages that you can make out of those concrete rebar panels that you find at Home Depot. We are talking of just making an 18" circle with them and tying with wire or zip ties. No cement is used.

Mary
I
HATE
METAL
CEMENTED
TO
ANYTHING!!!
I DID say venting...even though you were talking "rebar". Btw, I reuse rebar that had been pounded into landscape timbers which had rotted away. I use them to hold together my raised beds, instead of screwing or nailing the wood together.
 

ducks4you

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The woven wire cages used for containing tomato plants are VERY DANGEROUS for livestock as they tend to paw at the standing or stored cages. They get their legs tangled in the wire ( especially horses ) and may skin themselves to the knees or hocks at best or break their leg (s). This results in a very expensive Vet bill that can last with daily bandage changing care to a month or more. Depending on how big the wound is or how many legs are involved, those with multiple severe injuries, or brocken legs may/will have to be put down .:old
Thanks, Bob! It IS important to know these things, however, my horses are nowhere NEAR my tomato garden areas. I rotate them between my big garden, bed around the cistern (south of the house), bed south of the garage, and the old cattle fencing by the street. Unless my horses escape, they go nowhere near my tomatoes. I WILL say, people SHOULD listen to the advice of old horse people. There was a story of some girl's horse that broke it's neck bc she looped a stallion lean To the halter, horse got his foot caught in the chain lead and broke his neck panicking. I commented that it was stupid to do this, bc a stallion lead is a horse lead with 20 some inches of chain link used to put through the halter to control a stallion. I was called insensitive.
You NEVER loop it through the ring on a horse's halter. Usually, it is removable, and when you don't need it, you remove it.
We horse people ALWAYS, ALWAYS have to be one step ahead of our horses, so that they don't hurt themselves. My excellent 22yo stone broke mare has a stall where I have put in a support to help with the weight of yearly hay, 400 bales/~65 lbs each. It sits about 18 inches from the corner of the stall opening. I have looped 1 1/2 inches of a strip from a lightweight ratchet 3 ft high to prevent her from Trying to exit through the small space, where she would get trapped and then panic. It has been very helpful and Necessary.
So...thx, Bob!
 

bobm

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Thanks, Bob! It IS important to know these things, however, my horses are nowhere NEAR my tomato garden areas. I rotate them between my big garden, bed around the cistern (south of the house), bed south of the garage, and the old cattle fencing by the street. Unless my horses escape, they go nowhere near my tomatoes. I WILL say, people SHOULD listen to the advice of old horse people. There was a story of some girl's horse that broke it's neck bc she looped a stallion lean To the halter, horse got his foot caught in the chain lead and broke his neck panicking. I commented that it was stupid to do this, bc a stallion lead is a horse lead with 20 some inches of chain link used to put through the halter to control a stallion. I was called insensitive.
You NEVER loop it through the ring on a horse's halter. Usually, it is removable, and when you don't need it, you remove it.
We horse people ALWAYS, ALWAYS have to be one step ahead of our horses, so that they don't hurt themselves. My excellent 22yo stone broke mare has a stall where I have put in a support to help with the weight of yearly hay, 400 bales/~65 lbs each. It sits about 18 inches from the corner of the stall opening. I have looped 1 1/2 inches of a strip from a lightweight ratchet 3 ft high to prevent her from Trying to exit through the small space, where she would get trapped and then panic. It has been very helpful and Necessary.
So...thx, Bob!
I have stood quite a few stallions at stud, including client stallions and a ferral stalion from the wilds of Montana at UCD. If YOU value your LIFE that 20" chain will make even the most excitable stallion ( raging hormones ) a gentleman especially when they are to breed a mare. Those that call anyone insensitive or cruel, have absolutely NO knowledge of stallion behavior, and are good candidates for a luny bin. :old
 
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