Turnips. Haven't heard anyone growing them!

HiDelight

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mmmmm turnips onions and bacon instead of home fries instead of potatoes for breakfast are wonderful ..I used to not like turnips until I tried young ones! now I love them! it pays to give foods a second..third or whatever chances because it could be the quality and prep that maked us not like it to begin with ...
and why did I not plant any? I am not sure! but there is still time so I will because you started this thread :)

thank you!
 

herbsherbsflowers

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Down here in Georgia turnips and turnip greens are a fall and winter crop. It is getting close to time to plant them. They are really special cooked like this:

Turnips in Cream with Parmesan

1 pound young turnips
1/2 pint cream
grated nutmeg
fresh ground black pepper
1 clove garlic peeled and chopped
Grated parmesan to go on top
Scrub the turnips but leave the skins on. Slice them thinly. Toss in a
bowl with the cream and seasonings. Pout into a casserole dish. Cover
with foil and bake 45 minutes. Uncover and sprinkle with parmesan. Put
back in the oven to brown top under the broiler for just a few minutes.
The more parmesan the better.

People who say they don't like turnips love these.
 

HiDelight

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that sounds wonderful thank you so much for the recipe!!!! I will try it for sure!

they are also good in pot pies and in any soup like Hattie says minestrone for sure is much better with a few turnips in it!
 

davaroo

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lesa said:
Great? Would anyone really say turnips are "great". I would say they are an acquired taste at best... I love all veggies, but not turnips...they taste kind of sour to me?? How well do they keep? I know the ones in the stores are dipped in wax...
I would say they are great and they are an acquired taste. The best way to ensure you acquire that taste is to be hungry when you eat them. The best seasoning for any food is always hunger.

Seriously, they have a bitter twinge to them that potatoes don't have. It isn't objectionable, but it IS there. Like their close cousins the radishes, they are members of the cabbage family, brassicae.

Their great claim to fame is their overwintering ability. They are traditional winter fare, in most places where they are eaten. They are prolific, quick growing in less than ideal conditions and readily stored either in the ground or in covered heaps outdoors. They can be grown as either a main crop or tucked in just about anywhere there is a bit of space for them, just like radishes.
This non-fussy nature has led to their favor as a food source, especially and traditionally among the lesser classes in Europe.

Remember, the eclectic view of men we share in the modern age has not always been there - there were rich and poor back in those days. The poor ate turnips and rutabagas for the reasons mentioned, so the rich disdained them. To this day there are those who considered them little better than fodder for livestock.

Turnips also have a two-for-one punch - the tops are an excellent source of nutritious greens. When all else has failed from Autumns cooling conditions, turnips and swedes will still be there. Brassicas have a natural anti-freeze quality, and so can withstand all but the harshest killing cold. Once the greens are eaten through the Fall, the roots are there, to be eaten all winter.

There are also varieties that are grown just for the greens in spring and late in the year. The roots of these are not eaten, being small and woody. They are popular in the Southern US, where they are grown year round, due to the mild winters. All turnip greens are made better for the cold snaps and light frosts common early and late in the year.

With all this going for them , it's no wonder they are an old-school favorite.
 

4grandbabies

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Love turnips-home grown that is. I peel them, slice fairly thinly( 1/4" or so) and put them in a pan- saute them with butter, pepper, salt, a bit of sugar,and onion flakes, when they have simmered a while, I add some water and cook till tender. I like the cooking juice for my cornbread.. yummm!! When you sow the seeds, try adding them to very fine sand, then broadcasting them . We eat them until they freeze in the ground, some people I guess pull them and store in a root cellar.
My brother in law would make turnip kraut from them.. he loved it because it had a "bite to it" Just shred them and boil your vinegar, salt and water , pour hot liquid over turnips in jars.. seal and enjoy in a month or 2. :thumbsup
 

blurose

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If you look closely at the turnip after you cut off the stem end, you'll notice a faint color difference,between white and off-white with the off-white part being closer to the outside. I make sure to peel my turnips down past this off-white area and I get NO bitterness whatsoever, just a sweet and yummy taste. I hated turnips as a kid cause my mom didn't know to peel them this way. I am growing them in my garden this year in a bed that seems to not like my root vegs. So, I'm going to sow some in another bed for a later crop (fingers crossed).
 

davaroo

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blurose said:
If you look closely at the turnip after you cut off the stem end, you'll notice a faint color difference,between white and off-white with the off-white part being closer to the outside. I make sure to peel my turnips down past this off-white area and I get NO bitterness whatsoever, just a sweet and yummy taste. I hated turnips as a kid cause my mom didn't know to peel them this way. I am growing them in my garden this year in a bed that seems to not like my root vegs. So, I'm going to sow some in another bed for a later crop (fingers crossed).
SO basically take off the outer layer?
This goes against the grain, you know, cutting off good turnip. But its worth a try.

I don't mind the taste of turnips - what some call their bitterness. To me it is all nectar from the earth.

But if it means my family may give them a shot, hey I'm up for it.
 

Liberty7

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I found this turnip recipe on recipezaar.com which sounds good, and I'm going to try. (Doe my purposes, I would cut the recipe in half.)

CHEESY TURNIPS

6 cups turnips, peeled and sliced
1-1/4 cups water
3 small green onions, sliced
1 tblsp. butter or margarine
1 tsp. garlic powder
1 tsp. seasoning salt
1 tblsp. cornstarch
1/4 cup water
1 cup cheddar cheese, shredded

1. Place turnips in a large saucepan.

2. Add 1-1/4 cups water and bring to a boil.

3. Cover and cook for 12 minutes

4. Add green onions, butter, garlic powder and salt

5. Cook an additional 5 minutes.

6. Dissolve cornstarch in 1/4 cup water.

7. Add to turnips, stirring until combined.

8. Add cheese and cook until cheese melts.
 

davaroo

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Liberty7 said:
I found this turnip recipe on recipezaar.com which sounds good, and I'm going to try. (Doe my purposes, I would cut the recipe in half.)

CHEESY TURNIPS

6 cups turnips, peeled and sliced
1-1/4 cups water
3 small green onions, sliced
1 tblsp. butter or margarine
1 tsp. garlic powder
1 tsp. seasoning salt
1 tblsp. cornstarch
1/4 cup water
1 cup cheddar cheese, shredded

1. Place turnips in a large saucepan.

2. Add 1-1/4 cups water and bring to a boil.

3. Cover and cook for 12 minutes

4. Add green onions, butter, garlic powder and salt

5. Cook an additional 5 minutes.

6. Dissolve cornstarch in 1/4 cup water.

7. Add to turnips, stirring until combined.

8. Add cheese and cook until cheese melts.
Its interesting this is a stove top recipe. Somehow I imagined it more of an oven casserole, like au gratin potatoes.
 

lesa

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Okay, okay, you convinced me!! I'll plant some turnips next year! I am sure the ones I have had were way too large- softball or better. I cannot say I have ever had a turnip fresh out of the garden. Like all things, I am sure there is no comparison - store bought versus fresh! I love the idea that keep well for the winter. I'm in!
 
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