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Weed ID - Found in our woods - East Texas

Discussion in 'What Am I? Plant Identification' started by Devonviolet, Apr 2, 2016.

  1. Apr 2, 2016
    Devonviolet

    Devonviolet Deeply Rooted

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    DH & I were cutting Sow Thistle for our goats this evening. As we worked I saw the following weeds & wondered what they are:

    1. I'm thinking this is some kind of wild rose?
    0401161906b-1.jpg
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    2. This is next to the rose like plant, and looks similar. But, the leaves are bigger and on one stem, there are 5 leaves.
    0401161908-1.jpg
    0401161909-1.jpg
    0401161908a-1-1.jpg
    0401161909b-1.jpg
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    3. I'm 99% sure this is Plantain. But, the leaves are hairy & the Plantain, that we had in Pennsylvania had smooth leaves.
    0401161906-1-1.jpg
     

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  2. Apr 2, 2016
    Pulsegleaner

    Pulsegleaner Deeply Rooted

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    The "roses" look more like some kind of bramble to me. That's probably a good thing, as most brambles will produce some sort of edible berry (raspberries and blackberries are brambles) Which one(s) these are, I have no clue, there are so many.
     
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  3. Apr 2, 2016
    digitS'

    digitS' Garden Master

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    I wonder about your Plantain ... and, wander and wonder ;).

    We have 2 common Plantago species of lawn weeds - broad and narrow leaves. You will certainly know if you are off course when it begins to flower and it's this scraggly, white flowered weed.

    If it is, I have wandered through several weed ID sites over about 45 minutes looking for it!

    They are very common here altho usually outside the garden and not much for causing trouble within it. It's more of a "behind the garage" weed ;).

    @Gardening with Rabbits once asked about the one I'm thinking of and I said, "oh, it's that baby's breath type weed." Perhaps I shouldn't have suggested a gypsophilia. She didn't believe me anyway but if I'd said that I think it's in the borage family, maybe she would have found it for us ... gypsophilia is also in that family, if I remember right. It's that I don't think of borage plants as having white flowers.

    If it is a Cryptantha species, there are dozens and dozens to choose from! They are mostly desert plants but it's really a broad family. And! I can't find it!

    If you can keep an eye on it and note the flowers, you may be able to track down a name.

    By the way, you can delete duplicate posts. Just look for that button near the edit button. I think there is a time limit and you have to type in a reason for deleting. TEG seems to be prone to duplicate posts ...

    Steve
     
  4. Apr 2, 2016
    Devonviolet

    Devonviolet Deeply Rooted

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    Thanks for your input Steve. But I'm fairly certain this is Plantain.

    In PA, we had 2 varieties of Plantain in our yard: broadleaf and narrow leaf. The classic sign is the non-branched veining. The only difference is that this has a hairy leaf.

    I found one website that says Texas has 13 varieties of Plantain:
    http://essmextension.tamu.edu/plants/plant/plantain/

    The second photo, on this web page, is amazingly like my photo, right down to the "flower" stem coming out of the plant:
    http://www.foragingtexas.com/2008/08/plantin.html?m=1

    The distribution map shows plantain in the county next to ours - maybe 5 miles from our property.
     
  5. Apr 2, 2016
    Devonviolet

    Devonviolet Deeply Rooted

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    Thanks for your feedback @Pulsegleaner. It may well be some sort of wild berry/bramble.

    We do have a nasty bramble here, but it doesn't look anything like this. I will try to remember to get a photo of it tomorrow.

    We have had to clear the property line, getting ready for putting in perimeter fencing. Our bramble was so thick, we had to cut it with a metal blade on a weed trimmer. Many times we almost tripped because it seems to wrap itself around your ankles. NASTY!!!
     
  6. Apr 2, 2016
    Pulsegleaner

    Pulsegleaner Deeply Rooted

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    Given where you are, I'd say dewberry (smaller) and something like black raspberry (larger)
     
  7. Apr 2, 2016
    digitS'

    digitS' Garden Master

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    That Texas A & M ID has that typical plantain flower. There is no question.

    Maybe, I'll post a picture of the other critter soon just to aggravate @Gardening with Rabbits . The annual and herbaceous perennial weeds show up every year and, every year, I slowly begin to identify them again. I just hit a wall with the one I'm talking about. My excuse for all this is that I don't really like them around and have zero interest in thinking about them during the 6 months when they are not ;).

    Then, they show up, "common as a weed," and I feel uncomfortable not knowing what I am finding in my environment after so many seasons as a gardener. So many, the identification comes back to mind.

    Particularly, the ones that have plagued humanity since the dawn of agriculture, I grudgingly give their due respect and then we both, move on ... with me trying not to think about them through half the year, again ...

    :) Steve
     
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  8. Apr 2, 2016
    PhilaGardener

    PhilaGardener Deeply Rooted

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    Neither page breaks it down to species but your plant might be Plantago virginica; its range includes your area.
    http://uswildflowers.com/detail.php?SName=Plantago virginica
     
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  9. Apr 2, 2016
    catjac1975

    catjac1975 Garden Master

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    The first looks like a weed that sometimes has a small strawberry like berry. It produces lots of very prickly difficult to pull plants.The 2nd looks like a wild rose. Again invasive if let go. Red stemmed looks like blackberry-not worth the terrible thorns. The 3rd looks like a plantain seed, but I think that could be 2 different plants. The long leaves looks like a Rudbeckia or black eyed Susan.
     
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  10. Apr 2, 2016
    Devonviolet

    Devonviolet Deeply Rooted

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    You may be right on all three accounts @catjac1975. If I remember correctly, the first 2 get rather leggy & thick as the summer progresses. That is in addition to that nasty bramble! This winter I noticed some fencelines, along the roads we drive regularly, with low growing, thick, burgundy colored leaves - which had been green earlier in the year. The other day I noticed one of those patches had similar white flowers, to the ones in the first set of photos.

    The third plant, has the seed stems coming from the center of a rosette of leaves in the ground. Although on your theory of the Rudbeckia, we do get masses of yellow, daisy like flowers in the same area. Last year I was too busy & overwhelmed to take a close look. I just enjoyed the mass of yellow daisies, in passing.
     
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