What are You Eating from the Garden?

flowerbug

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cooked up some of the squash today, three of the green kabochas and the smallest of the hubbards. the hubbard wasn't fully done yet, so it was kinda like a cross between a summer squash and a winter squash. more watery and green than orange inside, but enough orange that it was ok once i mashed it up with the kabochas. the kabochas were dry so the watery from the hubbard worked out fine, i even added a bit of water as i mashed them to make it easier. when done mashing i warmed up some in a cup and put a bit of butter on them and then had a snack to restore my energy. :)
 

flowerbug

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Get advice from Ridge', @ducks4you ! There are probably others.

I go for the "mild" in that family: bok choy, Chinese cabbage, Typhon Holland greens.

If given a choice, I'll choose kohlrabi over turnips.

Steve
for greens? as i can't imagine anything milder in flavor than a purple top turnip. they don't have a huge amount of flavor to me (the roots as i don't eat the greens).

@ducks4you if you manage to leave some alive through the winter and into spring you'll have some nice plants with yellow flowers. :) note, i have a strange idea of "nice plant" so ... :) i like seeing the pods and the plants. when they're done and the seeds are ripe enough i harvest some of them and then bury the rest as a rotting turnip smells like beer to me. it's ok when you're in the garden, but stepping on one is a bit icky. lol...
 

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@ducks4you prepare the greens for cooking. Cook them long enough to be wilted, drain and pack in zip lock bags, then freeze.

Turnips-love to eat them raw or freshly simmered, but don't like them canned or frozen.
i love 'em fried enough to get just a bit of a burn on them. simmered and mashed they'd be fine too, but filler more than anything. too bad Mom hates 'em or i'd grow and eat them more often.
 

Trish Stretton

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Turnips along with Daikon radish are one of my fav plants to sow late summer early fall so that they flower from late winter right through to late spring. Bees just love them for both the nectar and ample pollen supplies.
Personally, I cant stand turnips.
 

digitS'

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Turnips along with Daikon radish are one of my fav plants to sow late summer early fall so that they flower from late winter right through to late spring. Bees just love them for both the nectar and ample pollen supplies...
Perhaps we should all take a lesson from that, to benefit beneficials in our own gardens.

Steve
 

Trish Stretton

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Perhaps we should all take a lesson from that, to benefit beneficials in our own gardens.

Steve
Yes, but then, it also depends on the temps. your winter are. Too cold and they just wont grow.
There are always other beneficial insect plants and times to plant out, so it does pay to think local, for all beneficial insects, not just my furry little friends.
 

digitS'

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Ah ... however, @Trish Stretton 🐝 ....

Might we be able to keep turnips and daikon in simple winter storage through the winter then, replant them in the garden in the spring? I will likely need to dig a pit in one of the backyard garden beds for carrots and parsnips, soon. Turnips and daikon should also be happy under a layer of soil and a couple of feet of leaves thru the coldest months. Supposedly, I'm growing a variety of daikon radish in 2021 especially for the harvesting of leaves for the table :).

Bee-friendly, specific crops might be an answer for @AMKuska and many gardeners with pollinators in short supply. Bloom season might occur during appropriate times for garden crops.

Steve 🐝 ....
 
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