What are You Eating from the Garden?

digitS'

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Carrots may have their biggest problems just starting in that top inch of the soil surface as tiny seeds and seedlings.

The collar is usually above the surface as the plant struggles to send a root downward in my planting beds. So much is exposed to the changes above ground, hour to hour, day to day. Stressful at times, I'm sure.

Have you tried parsnips, @Ridgerunner and @baymule ? They are not the same as carrots but similar. I was surprised that parsnips would do okay in my garden, associating them with a much different climate. They were right beside the carrots in 2020 but grew much better.

Steve
 

Cosmo spring garden

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I am a failure at growing carrots. For some reason, the whole process escapes me, I just do not do well at all with them. If I can get them to come up, if I can get them to survive, they are carrot rejects.

Congratulations of the beautiful carrots @Ridgerunner !!
Me too. I cant grow beets either. I still try tho lol.
 

ducks4you

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I am not sure it is a good idea to plant root vegetables next to each other. Regardless it is always a good idea to rotate, even if it's only 5 ft away from where you planted them last year. I have ALWAYS had success growing beets, even in the years where they don't get planted until nearly July!
Might try more compost? :hu
 

Ridgerunner

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Regardless it is always a good idea to rotate,

I agree. Last year I planted the winter root crops in the bed at the back right of this photo. This year they are in the bed on the front left. I don't know how I could have rotated them any further.

I need a new photo, this was taken just a little after I put them in. It looks a little different now. That compost pile is no longer there, that was a bad spot.

Overall.JPG


Might try more compost?

Compost is often a good idea. When I filled the beds they were about 40% compost. I know it goes away over time so my standard practice (which I did follow both times) is to add about 4" of compost every time I plant these beds and dig it in. Down here I typically plant them twice a year. You'd think adding that much compost would fill the beds up but by the time it's time to replant them there is always room. It does go away.

One of my thoughts is shade. This entire area gets good sun almost all day but that back fence is on the southwest side, it does cast a shadow fairly late in the day. But from other stuff I've grown in there I don't think that's a problem.
 
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