What is the song or poem weighs up how you feel today??

Marie2020

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In these day's of such uncertain times

 

Pulsegleaner

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It's remarkable how acquainted you are with Canada's Maritime traditional music and musicians!
Actually, it's funny you should mention that. It was only a few weeks ago that I realized that one or two of the songs from up there were ones I already knew from my childhood because the Canadian children's singing group Sharon Lois and Bram sang them.

I think the whole thing sort of started in college, when I got a copy of Garrison Keillor's Definitely Above Average album. One of the songs on that was a Maritime group covering the Irish folk song "The Belle of Belfast City". That started the taste for the stuff.

The thing that actually got my really started was, ironically, a parody album put out by the HPLS (The H.P. Lovecraft Historical Society) which was Lovecraftian variations of traditional sea shanties. That let me to look of the originals online, which led to Gaelic Storm, which led to Great Big Sea and there you go.

And, while I don't remember how I got there NOW, one nights hopping from song to song on YouTube got me in touch with the music traditions of Western Canada as well (which are more like American Country-Western music.)
In particular I found Stan Rodgers who I had vaguely heard of before (due to the plot of his song "Harris and the Mare" being used for an episode of the CBC show Vanishing Point.
 

Pulsegleaner

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@Pulsegleaner Many of us would dance too this


Well, THIS is surprising! That's the EXACT version I heard on the Garrison Keillor album all that time ago! (not the same RECORDING, they were older in that one, but definitely the same group.)

Melody wise, I think I like the Gaelic Storm version best (like the harmonica)

Then there is the Irish Rovers version, which, while not having the most daring music DOES include the "lost" (second) verse.

There are also a few versions out there that swap Belfast with Dublin, possibly because there are some people in the Irish Free State who STILL don't want to have anything to do with Northern Ireland (I've heard Mooney turned to Murphy, for probably the same reason.)
 
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Marie2020

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Well, THIS is surprising! That's the EXACT version I heard on the Garrison Keillor album all that time ago! (not the same RECORDING, they were older in that one, but definitely the same group.)

Melody wise, I think I like the Gaelic Storm version best (like the harmonica)

Then there is the Irish Rovers version, which, while not having the most daring music DOES include the "lost" (second) verse.

There are also a few versions out there that swap Belfast with Dublin, possibly because there are some people in the Irish Free State who STILL don't want to have anything to do with Northern Ireland (I've heard Mooney turned to Murphy, for probably the same reason.)
:love💃 Real toe tapping music

It's so sad people judging each other just because of where they are from :(
 

heirloomgal

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Actually, it's funny you should mention that. It was only a few weeks ago that I realized that one or two of the songs from up there were ones I already knew from my childhood because the Canadian children's singing group Sharon Lois and Bram sang them.

I think the whole thing sort of started in college, when I got a copy of Garrison Keillor's Definitely Above Average album. One of the songs on that was a Maritime group covering the Irish folk song "The Belle of Belfast City". That started the taste for the stuff.

The thing that actually got my really started was, ironically, a parody album put out by the HPLS (The H.P. Lovecraft Historical Society) which was Lovecraftian variations of traditional sea shanties. That let me to look of the originals online, which led to Gaelic Storm, which led to Great Big Sea and there you go.

And, while I don't remember how I got there NOW, one nights hopping from song to song on YouTube got me in touch with the music traditions of Western Canada as well (which are more like American Country-Western music.)
In particular I found Stan Rodgers who I had vaguely heard of before (due to the plot of his song "Harris and the Mare" being used for an episode of the CBC show Vanishing Point.
When my kids were smaller we LOVED listening to Sharon, Lois and Bram! So many happy memories of all of us singing together in the car to their energetic songs. Raffi, Fred Penner too. I really made an effort to include lots of musical energy into our day to day life, which was easy as we had so many lessons for so many years and thus lots of time travelling in the car. At a young age my kids were singing Frank Sinatra, Charles Aznavour, John Denver, Elvis, Chuck Berry. Was so much fun!

Now, if I want to really bug them I play Sharon, Lois and Bram or the Smurfs theme song on youtube. :lol: Never fails to get them up in arms.
 

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