What weird food did you eat as a kid?

Dahlia

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I was reading a post by Flowerbug and it sounds like she found out what ants tasted like. So, I thought it would be fun to see what strange things other folks ate as a kid!

I once ate some meow mix out in the garage when no one was watching! Lol!
 

Dirtmechanic

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Alaskan ice cream (also known as Alaskan Indian ice cream, Inuit ice cream, Indian ice cream or Native ice cream, and Inuit-Yupik varieties of which are known as akutaq or akutuq) is a dessert made by Alaskan Athabaskans and other Alaska Natives. It is traditionally made of whipped fat or tallow (e.g. caribou, moose, or walrus tallow, or seal oil) and meat (such as dried fish, especially pike, sheefish or inconnu, whitefish or cisco, or freshwater whitefishes, or dried moose or caribou) mixed with berries (especially cowberry, bilberry, Vaccinium oxycoccos or other cranberries, bearberry, crowberry, salmonberry, cloudberry or low-bush salmonberry, raspberry, blueberry, or prickly rose) or mild sweeteners such as roots of Indian potato or wild carrot, mixed and whipped with a whisk. It may also include tundra greens. There is also a kind of akutaq which is called snow akutaq. The most common recipes for Indian ice cream consist of dried and pulverized moose or caribou tenderloin that is blended with moose fat (traditionally in a birch bark container) until the mixture is light and fluffy. It may be eaten unfrozen or frozen, and in the latter case it somewhat resembles commercial ice cream.[1]
 

Dahlia

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Alaskan ice cream (also known as Alaskan Indian ice cream, Inuit ice cream, Indian ice cream or Native ice cream, and Inuit-Yupik varieties of which are known as akutaq or akutuq) is a dessert made by Alaskan Athabaskans and other Alaska Natives. It is traditionally made of whipped fat or tallow (e.g. caribou, moose, or walrus tallow, or seal oil) and meat (such as dried fish, especially pike, sheefish or inconnu, whitefish or cisco, or freshwater whitefishes, or dried moose or caribou) mixed with berries (especially cowberry, bilberry, Vaccinium oxycoccos or other cranberries, bearberry, crowberry, salmonberry, cloudberry or low-bush salmonberry, raspberry, blueberry, or prickly rose) or mild sweeteners such as roots of Indian potato or wild carrot, mixed and whipped with a whisk. It may also include tundra greens. There is also a kind of akutaq which is called snow akutaq. The most common recipes for Indian ice cream consist of dried and pulverized moose or caribou tenderloin that is blended with moose fat (traditionally in a birch bark container) until the mixture is light and fluffy. It may be eaten unfrozen or frozen, and in the latter case it somewhat resembles commercial ice cream.[1]
Sounds like pemmican! I've made a simple version of that before. It lasts forever out of the fridge!
 

flowerbug

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I was reading a post by Flowerbug and it sounds like she found out what ants tasted

"he"


like. So, I thought it would be fun to see what strange things other folks ate as a kid!

I once ate some meow mix out in the garage when no one was watching! Lol!

i didn't intentionally eat them. primary taste was formic acid. which to me tasted like Pepsi. i'd never liked Pepsi anyways so it wasn't any big problem to me, but i've never looked at any Pepsi commercials or drinks without thinking of the ants...
 

Dahlia

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"he"




i didn't intentionally eat them. primary taste was formic acid. which to me tasted like Pepsi. i'd never liked Pepsi anyways so it wasn't any big problem to me, but i've never looked at any Pepsi commercials or drinks without thinking of the ants...
How weird that ants taste like Pepsi! I know some people eat chocolate covered ants. I've never been tempted by that "treat!"
 

ducks4you

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I was born in Philly, so we ate local stuff.
Here are thred of them, not exclusive to the "City of Brotherly Love."
scrapple
blood sausage (aka rice sausage, to the squemish)
 

SPedigrees

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I think on two separate occasions as a kid I once ate an earthworm and drank a few sips of human pee on a dare. Without a dare to excuse it, I also ate a large minnow that i caught, raw. On that one I started to worry afterwards that I would sicken or die, so I confessed to my parents and they assured me I would be fine, and they also thought the whole episode was hilarious. It's a wonder that kids ever survive to adulthood. Puppies are the same way! They put everything into their mouths!

On more conventional grounds, my grandfather was a great outdoorsman and we ate a lot of venison and ducks that he had shot. On New Years we used to have a game dinner of rabbit, squirrel, gamebirds of various types, as well as the above mentioned quarry. Organ meats were delicacies, then and at thanksgiving when we had the more traditional turkey bought from a neighboring farm, and I make giblet stuffing to this day as my grandmother used to.

Now as an old person, many foods are not available to buy, because only old people like them. I and my peers, it seems, are being phased out! Pepperidge Farms used to market delicious macaroon cookies - can't get them anymore nor find a recipe that tastes as they did. Olive loaf used to be a common deli-meat, but that too has been discontinued because the market for it is shrinking. Tongue sandwiches, once commonplace at Jewish delis, are now unheard of, and tongue was a meat that needs to be aged and processed in a complicated manner that I would have no hope of recreating here at home. (At least I still can get pastrami.) Those fat knockwuurst sausages served with sauerkraut have also gone the way of the dodo. Sauerkraut is still available, but name is now shortened to "kraut" because people apparently are too lazy to pronounce or read a food name with more than one syllable. (I'm surprised that the existing name hasn't been replaced for pc fear of offending those of German nationality - that will probably be next. lol) Jello salads and deviled eggs are now traveling down the path to extinction. A large segment of the newest generation has never heard of either one. Fried liver and onions have vanished from the menu at most diners. (Diners themselves are becoming casualties of the new world order.)
 
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