Wide variance in basil.

Ben E Lou

Garden Ornament
Joined
Dec 13, 2018
Messages
137
Reaction score
383
Points
97
Location
Greensboro, NC (7b)
442FE58F-58ED-41B3-AFE5-135A6887094D.jpeg
442FE58F-58ED-41B3-AFE5-135A6887094D.jpeg
70CEDDFF-E846-4DF9-B817-CBA956FC878B.jpeg
756FF3BD-6784-49FA-9566-BC61F6342FD9.jpeg
I’m experiencing wide variance in how my basil is doing, even in some cases where the plants are right next to each other like in these two pictures. Any idea what might be causing some to thrive and others to flounder?
 

ducks4you

Garden Master
Joined
Sep 4, 2009
Messages
5,986
Reaction score
3,388
Points
377
Location
East Central IL, Was Zone 6, Now...maybe Zone 5
The basil that isn't doing well got drowned some while in the bed, I am thinking. I have a sad sack basil sitting on my kitchen window sill. It wants more heat, so I may move it to a heat mat for awhile. Anybody else?
I would recommend a dehydrator for your herbs. For herbs you don't need an expensive one, and they store great in canning jars for use in the winter.
 

digitS'

Garden Master
Joined
Dec 13, 2007
Messages
19,608
Reaction score
9,191
Points
457
Location
border, ID/WA(!)
Check the stems.

Basil is vulnerable to fusarium wilt. In time, it will cause stems to brown at the soil line (& die). I have had limited success with hilling around the plants but, really, that isn't much of a step up from tossing them ...

The best is to buy fusarium resistant varieties. They have the oddest names: Gekofur and Nufar. Dolly is a nice plant and has resistance, we are told. Have had no problem with these sweet types.

If you like Asian basil, there seems to be no problem with fusarium in my garden.

Steve
 

thistlebloom

Garden Master
Joined
Dec 2, 2010
Messages
16,171
Reaction score
16,415
Points
447
Location
North Idaho 48th parallel
I noticed something in one of your pictures Ben, ....



the tiny plant on the lower right seems to be in a peat pot.
It's essential when you plant the peat pots into the ground that you tear off any exposed pot that's above ground level. If you don't, that portion of the pot that's above ground will wick moisture and your plants roots will dry out, even if you are applying enough water to the rest of the garden. That could be one reason for that plants failure at least.

But the rest of your garden looks fantastic. I think you're doing a stellar job.
 

seedcorn

Garden Master
Joined
Jun 21, 2008
Messages
8,108
Reaction score
6,408
Points
397
Location
NE IN
Bottom right is dying. (1)
Bottom left is starting to die. (2)
Upper right is not thriving. (3)
Upper left is thriving. (4)

I would guess 1 has had too much water (could be lack of water), #2-too much water, #3-check for grubs or nutrient tie up (feed it some nitrogen, see if it takes off), #4-duplicate environment.
I’d never plant peat pots as I believe they restrict root development.
 

catjac1975

Garden Master
Joined
Jul 22, 2010
Messages
8,303
Reaction score
6,919
Points
387
Location
Mattapoisett, Massachusetts
View attachment 31449 View attachment 31449 View attachment 31450 View attachment 31451 I’m experiencing wide variance in how my basil is doing, even in some cases where the plants are right next to each other like in these two pictures. Any idea what might be causing some to thrive and others to flounder?
The one that is dying, it appears that the peat pot is sticking out of the ground. That is a sure killer. But all of that black plastic and wood mulch. Wood mulch kills a lot of plants. Would never use it with basil. It all looks too wet. Pull away the wood mulch. I am a big fan of grass clippings.
 

ducks4you

Garden Master
Joined
Sep 4, 2009
Messages
5,986
Reaction score
3,388
Points
377
Location
East Central IL, Was Zone 6, Now...maybe Zone 5
Bottom right is dying. (1)
Bottom left is starting to die. (2)
Upper right is not thriving. (3)
Upper left is thriving. (4)

I would guess 1 has had too much water (could be lack of water), #2-too much water, #3-check for grubs or nutrient tie up (feed it some nitrogen, see if it takes off), #4-duplicate environment.
I’d never plant peat pots as I believe they restrict root development.
That is true! We all have used them, but there are alternatives, even planting in plastic and then removing. If you ever have trouble removing a plant that is root bound from a permanent pot, fill a bucket with water deeper than the pot, and submerge it for an hour. I guarantee the plant will come out easily.
 

seedcorn

Garden Master
Joined
Jun 21, 2008
Messages
8,108
Reaction score
6,408
Points
397
Location
NE IN
Me, NO PATIENCE. come out or I’ll rip you out and you can regrow the lost roots....
 

so lucky

Garden Master
Joined
Mar 5, 2011
Messages
8,187
Reaction score
4,583
Points
377
Location
SE Missouri, Zone 6
A peat pot can be pulled away from the plant, and if it is rootbound, the soil inside will stay intact. If nothing else, holes can be poked into the sides and bottom so the roots have a place to escape. Also, you probably know to unwrap a rootbound wad before you stick it in the ground, even if you have to cut a few roots to do it.
 
Top