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Winging it.

Discussion in 'Gardening With Animals' started by digitS', Jan 18, 2018.

  1. Jan 19, 2018
    Nyboy

    Nyboy Garden Master

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    Steve if squirrels are a problem put hot pepper on food. Birds don't have taste buds for hot and can eat any pepper no matter how hot, squirrels don't have the same ability.
     
    digitS' likes this.
  2. Jan 19, 2018
    thistlebloom

    thistlebloom Garden Master

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    I have a large variety of birds come to my feeders and suet. I wrote them all down once - it was a long list- and I can't remember who all was on it or how many there were, you'll just have to take my word for it, it was a looong list. :)

    I always have chickadees and nuthatches. Pine siskins (should these all be capitalized?) are regulars but I don't pay attention to which season they are here the most. Right now I have some really cute common Redpolls out there, looks like they're cleaning the pine needles, maybe eating spiders or something...
    Flickers come for the suet, as well as Hairy and Downy woodpeckers. Jays (Gray and Stellar) , goldfinches, house finches, Juncos, Evening Grosbeaks, Crossbills,....lots more that aren't bubbling up right now.

    I keep a birdbath full, and use a heater in it in the winter so there's always water for birds that aren't attracted by the seed and suet. Robins love the bird bath.
    They are all really enjoyable to watch.

    Oh I forgot my very favorite! Hummers! Calliope, Rufous, Broadtail and Annas. If we could only have one bird visitor I'd pick hummers, though I'd miss all the others a lot.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2018
    so lucky likes this.
  3. Jan 19, 2018
    so lucky

    so lucky Garden Master

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    I agree, @thistlebloom, I think the hummers are my favorite, too. Unfortunately, we only have Ruby-throated here, with a rare Rufous.
    Bluebirds are my next favorite. Their soft little song is so sweet. We have been lucky to have at least one breeding pair here every summer, and have to help them fight off the English sparrows from the houses.
    @Nyboy, I don't know any reason why you wouldn't have bluebirds there at your weekend home. Do you have appropriate houses mounted on posts?
    Back when bluebirds were becoming very scarce in Missouri, a local man started making bluebird houses and distributing them all over the area. He was instrumental in getting all us local yokels educated on what a bluebird needs. I think he probably saved the species single-handedly.
     
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  4. Jan 20, 2018
    thistlebloom

    thistlebloom Garden Master

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    My mom did battle with English sparrows every year. She bought an air pistol just for that purpose. They would take over the nest boxes and kill or kick out the swallows that she loved.
    When she wasn't successful with her air pistol she would march out there and aim the hose at them.
    Mom could be feisty!
     
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  5. Jan 20, 2018
    Collector

    Collector Garden Addicted

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    Yes, still find Huns down this way though not nearly as many as there used to be 20 years ago or so. Lots of pheasants around here also, the double barrel ranch is just down the road a mile or so. They release a few thousand birds every year for hunters to hunt. Mostly around our yard we see more grouse than any other game birds. It kind of more forest right around our place ,it opens up to fields and farming about a mile south of here. We still get the others but not as many . Also a few small forest birds I am not familiar with, need to get ahold of a local bird book.
     
    digitS' likes this.
  6. Jan 20, 2018
    Larisa

    Larisa Deeply Rooted

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    Thrush digging snow.

    1.jpg
    2.jpg
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    It does this very carefully!

    4.jpg
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    It digs and bounces.

    6.jpg
     
  7. Jan 20, 2018
    Larisa

    Larisa Deeply Rooted

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    Bullfinch watches him. :cool:

    7.jpg

    Thrush flew away and the bullfinch took his place.

    8.jpg

    Thrush returned and drove the bullfinch.

    9.jpg

    Himself began to dig!

    11.jpg

    Then the bullfinch began to dig higher!

    10.jpg

    Probably there is a treasure ...:cool:
     
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  8. Jan 20, 2018
    digitS'

    digitS' Garden Master

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    There are so many of the Little Brown Jobs (LBJ's), the life of a birdwatcher trying to make ID's becomes difficult. Sometimes, it's just that they are small and you can't see them well. Like, the only time I was comfortable identifying a Vireo was when I found one, dead on a sidewalk. I know! Very Sad.

    There is also the problem that some species just don't have many identifying marks. Sometimes, the marks that birds do have, aren't consistent across their range of geography. That's kind of fun to think about but the handy guide book isn't quite so helpful if it's showing birds on the opposite sides of the continent.

    Steve
     
  9. Jan 20, 2018
    digitS'

    digitS' Garden Master

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    Hey! @Larisa !!!

    :frow .

    A widely found American bird to compare to your thrush is his cousin: the American Robin. In the northern latitudes, we are beginning to wait with real anticipation for the Robin to return with the spring season.

    Steve :)
     
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  10. Jan 20, 2018
    Nyboy

    Nyboy Garden Master

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    Lucky in over 10 years I did see 1 blue bird in my yard. Made my day seeing it.
     
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