Winter Squash & Pumpkins

digitS'

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I thought that I would share some pictures and such from the vines :). This may look like a pumpkin but it should be all squash, C. maxima.

IMG_20200829_082442_01~3.jpg

The seed company decided that La Madera would be restricted to members only so I saved and planted seed from the one I had grown. I had others of this type in the garden that first year. If I would have to guess, Sweet Meat contributed some genetics to my saved seed. Shall we say, the fruit that year was several shades of tan.

This year, each of several vines are producing something different! This one was the most mature but I will try to have pictures of the brothers and sisters.

Also, my new Cinnamon Girl pie pumpkins. They have done well and are turning orange and maturing nicely!

Steve :D
 

digitS'

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I'm fairly confident that it will be delicious - La Madera was. There was very little flesh to that original variety, which was kinda disappointing - lots of empty space in the interior.

I'm not 100% pleased that DW decided to bring this one home because it's likely just developing that winter squash flavor and that probably also means that the seed isn't mature. There are more that look like this even if, genetically, we would not know what fruit the next generation would have.

It was 6 years ago when I had the actual La Madera. Besides the Sweet Meat, there were my usual Buttercup and Cha Cha Kabocha. The 4 are all C. maxima and you will see the size of the "buttercup type" compared to the parent. I'll post a picture in a few weeks.

These things are really mixed up genetically. I missed a couple of seasons so I think that this is an f3. Whatever the case, I have made zero attempts in selecting for desired characteristics. And, they are only isolated by a couple hundred feet from this year's buttercup and kabocha. Honestly, I have looked back every year to see if Native Seed Search has La Madera available again.

Steve
 

digitS'

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That's lovely! How did you care for them? What is the soil like? How much water? Can I have a seed?? :D
Wait to see the others, AMK ;). They are just growing near the melons, pumpkins and zucchini. Don't worry, they shouldn't cross with those.

My soil is 50% gravel, I often say and it may well be accurate. About 3/4" of water is put on 3 times per week from overhead sprinklers.

Steve
 

digitS'

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teg squash.jpg

This is another heterozygous La Madera squash. (Did I use the right term 🤔 ?)

There will be one more photo of the 3rd type. It seems to be quite obviously either the Buttercup or Kabocha as one parent. I doubt if it will be possible to know. Shucks, any one of 4 could be parent or grandparent.

It is now time that these would come home during some years although we still haven't had any temperature below of the 40'sF, or very far below. I will leave most of the squash out there until there's a real danger that frost will happen.

Steve
 
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baymule

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Nice! My pink banana has put on another squash, it is growing fast. Will it make it to frost? Dunno. It probably has more to fear from the sheep that will be turned out on the garden as soon as the danged corn is ready. @digitS' if I pick it before it turns tan on the rind, will it still be good?
 

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@digitS' if I pick it before it turns tan on the rind, will it still be good?
I imagine so, Bay'.

However, an immature winter squash won't have the flavor of a mature squash. They even develop more flavor in winter storage.

I'm not someone who likes summer squash and my trials with pumpkins uncarved from Halloween didn't yield that much wonderful food because they are so mild flavored. However, I was pleased learning that I really do not have to wait until a more prescribed time and date to enjoy winter squash. An expected long season to enjoy them at the table became even longer - by several weeks before frost.

Immature squash won't store well. If it's really bland try turning it into soup with a can of tuna fish. Think of it as a variation of New England clam chowder. Maybe with some diced mushrooms ...

Steve
 
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