Worm Tower?

Zeedman

Garden Addicted
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The best way I know to break down large amounts of organic material is to turn it under; but I only do so at year's end. Until then, I just spread anything collected on the soil surface, where it won't be walked on. Worms will pull smaller stuff down, and nibble on larger debris as it decomposes.

I'm very picky about adding organic material to the garden though. All home-grown trimmings, husks, hulls, etc. get returned to the gardens they came from (we keep separate collection buckets). Leaves & grass clippings from our yard, and from neighbors who don't treat their lawns, get spread there too. But any peels, seeds, or trimmings from store-bought fruit or veggies get tossed back into the tree line. I don't want to risk introducing any new diseases or harmful organisms into the gardens... we are dealing with enough invasive species as it is, without adding anything new. :(
 

meadow

Deeply Rooted
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Well! I got to visit with the neighbor over the garden fence today. It seems SHE is feeding the squirrels. ;) She is also the one with the walnut tree. So it looks like they are here to stay. Hopefully they will be so well fed that they won't bother with my garden. 🥺

I'll be making some sort of modular cages to protect young plants. The transplanted snap peas are currently protected by scraps of chicken wire (it looks like Fort Knox!), and the three other beds are in low tunnels. Just need to come up with a plan before cutting into the roll of wire! 😁
 

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