Xerocles head in the clouds and feet firmly in the mud.

Ridgerunner

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I already have Purple Hull peas, Bluejay snap beans, and Bodacious sweet corn coming up. Before I went out there to plant them I had a nice sketch of where I was going to out what. I totally changed that when I put the seeds in the ground. That's not very unusual for me.

On the blackberry the typical way I plant them is to take a section of root maybe a foot long and bury it just under the soil surface when it is dormant. I don't know what your roots look like in that container after a year, probably a jumbled mess. And they are already sprouting. I'd dump that plant out and separate out some roots to slightly bury. You might see some roots with buds just showing, if you do I'd select those. If those bus break off I would not worry, it will send out more. If you don't see roots with buds try those anyway. It should work. Re-pot what is left as an insurance policy. I don't think you'll need it but why not be safe, especially when you are the one doing the work.

That blueberry is more iffy. I'd probably still set it out but you can try waiting another year. I've seen "pick your own" places keep their blueberries in containers year around. I don't know how big that variety of blueberry is supposed to get or how big that pot is. You could try to re-pot it in a bigger pot. In my opinion this is one of those where it is "better" to transplant when they are dormant but I think you are unlikely to lose the plant if you set it out or re-pot now as long as you keep it watered without drowning it.
 

thistlebloom

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Blueberries are sold completely in leaf at nurseries all the time. I have planted dozens, out of pots, leafed out, mid season and even sometimes in bloom, and they never skip a beat. I think there's no fuss involved at all. It will be better off in the ground than in a pot for another year.
 

flowerbug

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Plant them. My philosophy is "It will live or it won't." Pretty simple, huh? LOL
as long as you are doing that planting during the hottest times of the year that will help improve chances of survival. for those who live in the hottest climates it is usually a real good idea to plant at the beginning of the previous wet/cooler period for things like trees and shrubs so it gives them a chance to get established before the worst of the stressors comes along.
 

Xerocles

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I finally did it. My garden is officially begun. I planted the Blackberry, I planted the blueberry. And I planted sugar snap peas and lettuce. Oh yeah, and cilantro.
The indoor plants have me a little worried. Okay, okay, everything about this has me a little worried. But more specific, a few of the plants in the plastic seed starter tray are up. Most are not. Two of the plants have already grown up and are touching the plastic cover. That can't be good. Direct contact with all the moisture condensed inside the cover is probably going to rot those two before most of the others come up and allow me to ventilate.
 

thistlebloom

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Use a spoon and pick out the two tall ones, replant in a different container. Your other seeds may or may not germinate. Better to let the two growing ones do their best.

And congratulations on getting the garden ball rolling!
 

Xerocles

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@thistlebloom I took your advice. Spooned the largest out. The "roots" were still only one root. So the putting soil naturally crumbled away, leaving me with a pitiful single rooted stem with only a pair of cotyledons. But I carefully and gently repotted. Next day, they were really pitiful looking, lying down on the soil. But I kept them on the seed mat, and under the led grow light. Those were sweet (bell) peppers. I also included a few tomatoes which were getting kinda tall. Also a few other seedlings.
The peppers are robust, deep vibrant green, but no true leaves yet. The tomatoes that I transplanted at the same time have mostly opened true first leaves but generally don't look as healthy and robust as the peppers. The other seeds are truly growing like "weeds". They already have at least TWO sets of true leaves and are already(although tiny) exhibiting their "fan" shape.
Question for anyone. I have been leaving the growlight on 24 hrs/day, watching for signs of soil drying. Is this bad. Do they need a "sleep" period?
 

thistlebloom

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Oh, I must have missed that they were just tiny sprouts without even true leaves yet. I wouldn't have told you to transplant in that case. There is no problem with ventilating before all the seeds have sprouted btw. I assume that just means you are lifting the clear top off a seedling tray.
Has anything else sprouted in that flat?
I give my seedlings under light a rest period of 8 hours darkness +-.
 
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